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Sweden is Europe’s Right-wing success story

The Sweden Democrats may inspire a new Right-wing wave across European. Credit: Getty

August 25, 2023 - 1:00pm

There is a silent revolution taking place in Europe: Right-wing populists are learning how to actually wield power. Though Italy’s Giorgia Meloni has been making headlines for her tackling of issues from welfare state reforms to new immigration policies, it is the less high-profile case of Sweden which has proven even more dramatic. The Right-wing Sweden Democrats are not officially part of the government, yet under the “Tidö Agreement” they are a crucial supporter and guarantor of parliamentary majorities for the centre-right government of Prime Minister Ulf Kristersson. 

In recent days, the country’s parliament has decided to lift a ban on uranium mining and presented a policy plan to double electricity production over the next 20 years. This comes hot on the heels of discovering massive rare earth deposits, and one can easily imagine that the new enthusiasm for uranium will quickly extend to these crucial resources as well. 

Sweden is evidently willing to break with EU dogma on the environment: in June it abandoned the 100% renewables goal and reversed the decades-long policy of phasing out nuclear power. In addition, an offshore wind farm has been rejected and the construction of at least 10 new nuclear reactors announced, marking a seismic shift in the country’s energy policy. 

Sweden’s leadership, as with many Right-of centre governments, was swept into power largely thanks to its stance on immigration. Gang violence in cities has been rampant for years, with unassimilated immigrants comprising a significant part of the problem. On average, one gang-related shooting takes place almost every day, a sad record for a country usually known for safety and tranquillity. 

In fact, the country’s immigration policy was so out of balance that in 2015 the ratio of boys to girls was 123 to 100 among 15 and 16-year-olds. This mismatch was greater than in the same age group in China meaning that Swedish immigration managed to create within a few years the same demographic problems that resulted from several decades of China’s one-child policy. Shortly after coming to power, the new government embarked on a policy of tighter immigration policies, including an international campaign to discourage would-be immigrants and asylum seekers from coming to Sweden. 

In the economic realm, the government plans to push for tax cuts, and has proposed an industrial policy that goes beyond the Franco-German preference for subsidies. This also underlines the new Swedish approach to energy policy, demonstrating a keen understanding of the connection between affordable electricity and its effect on industry. The Nordic countries have often been described as charting a “third way” between socialism and capitalism, a tradition that isn’t going away. This time, however, the country is also championing a newfound realism when it comes to energy and immigration policies. 

Witnessing this success, European Right-wing parties — especially Germany’s AfD and France’s Rassemblement National — may start to emulate the Italian and Swedish model. Should this happen, the old continent could be at the beginning of a Right-wing wave not seen in decades.

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Mark Goodhand
MG
Mark Goodhand
7 months ago

It’s tragic that Britain is heading towards a decade or more of Labour-led status quo decline just as governments on the continent are waking up to the problems of uncontrolled immigration and Net Zero.
Brexit aside, we never escaped New Labour, and we’re as desperate for change as we were in 2010.

Derek Smith
Derek Smith
7 months ago
Reply to  Mark Goodhand

Ironically, the Remainers should be very thankful for Brexit for this reason alone.

j watson
j watson
7 months ago
Reply to  Mark Goodhand

‘Woe is me’. Tories and the Right will have had 14 years in power and still looking for excuses rather than proper, intelligent reflection on the inherent contradictions in their projects and over fixation on slogans rather than competent government. Isn’t it all rather pathetic and snowflakey? ‘It’s not fair, someone else to blame etc’
Of course with a number of right leaning Governments within Europe and EU, yet none (yes, none) seeking to leave, the stupidity of Brexit just further illuminated. We could have been leading a new direction had we not stropped off.

Hugh Bryant
HB
Hugh Bryant
7 months ago
Reply to  j watson

This idea that we were somehow ‘leading’ in Europe is the most delusional of all remainer delusions, I’m afraid.

j watson
j watson
7 months ago
Reply to  Hugh Bryant

You keep having the tendency to rush your reading HB, probably due to rising indignation clouding judgment.
My point in the last sentence is about ‘now’. Arguably the majority of EU nations would now see UK as their more natural leader whereas go back 10yrs or so it was more Franco-German. Alas the chance gone, at least for a generation.

Hugh Bryant
HB
Hugh Bryant
7 months ago
Reply to  j watson

Or perhaps my misunderstanding is a consequence of your inability to express yourself clearly.

Hugh Bryant
Hugh Bryant
7 months ago
Reply to  j watson

Or perhaps my misunderstanding is a consequence of your inability to express yourself clearly.

j watson
j watson
7 months ago
Reply to  Hugh Bryant

You keep having the tendency to rush your reading HB, probably due to rising indignation clouding judgment.
My point in the last sentence is about ‘now’. Arguably the majority of EU nations would now see UK as their more natural leader whereas go back 10yrs or so it was more Franco-German. Alas the chance gone, at least for a generation.

R Wright
R Wright
7 months ago
Reply to  j watson

I have seen no right wing policies be implemented in 14 years. What power?

Frank Leahy
FL
Frank Leahy
7 months ago
Reply to  R Wright

J Watson is surely correct to say UK elites were leading the EU, but leading in the wrong direction. With UK gone, wiser countries like Hungary, Poland and Sweden are reasserting intelligent governance. Now the UK needs to rid itself of its own failed elites. Almost zero progress so far, but at least the excuse that EU rules force us into nonsensical policies is no longer available. The tories are a waste of space, is there an alternative?

j watson
JW
j watson
7 months ago
Reply to  Frank Leahy

Blame some non descript ‘elites’ just a new form of excuse replacing bureaucrats in Brussels. It’s woeful. We’ve been led by Eton and Winchester for most of the last 14years. Doesn’t get much more Elite than that.

j watson
j watson
7 months ago
Reply to  Frank Leahy

Blame some non descript ‘elites’ just a new form of excuse replacing bureaucrats in Brussels. It’s woeful. We’ve been led by Eton and Winchester for most of the last 14years. Doesn’t get much more Elite than that.

j watson
j watson
7 months ago
Reply to  R Wright

Err Austerity? Brexit predominantly a Right wing project (albeit some support on Left too). Both pretty fundamental. Rwanda as the solution to illegal immigration as another etc etc. Scrapping of Sure Start at a more micro-level another lesser example. The Right loved that – make sure the poorest kids don’t get a rebalancing in early life opportunities.
I suspect what you mean is Policy implementation to your satisfaction as much as Policies you think they haven’t followed.
But fundamentally my main point is 14yrs tied the Right in knots because many right wing policies clash with one another – Neo-Liberalism vs Little England; free-market vs need for national training plan to wean us off immigration etc

Jerry Carroll
Jerry Carroll
7 months ago
Reply to  R Wright

In fact, the Blob has acquired even more powers of obstruction.

Frank Leahy
Frank Leahy
7 months ago
Reply to  R Wright

J Watson is surely correct to say UK elites were leading the EU, but leading in the wrong direction. With UK gone, wiser countries like Hungary, Poland and Sweden are reasserting intelligent governance. Now the UK needs to rid itself of its own failed elites. Almost zero progress so far, but at least the excuse that EU rules force us into nonsensical policies is no longer available. The tories are a waste of space, is there an alternative?

j watson
JW
j watson
7 months ago
Reply to  R Wright

Err Austerity? Brexit predominantly a Right wing project (albeit some support on Left too). Both pretty fundamental. Rwanda as the solution to illegal immigration as another etc etc. Scrapping of Sure Start at a more micro-level another lesser example. The Right loved that – make sure the poorest kids don’t get a rebalancing in early life opportunities.
I suspect what you mean is Policy implementation to your satisfaction as much as Policies you think they haven’t followed.
But fundamentally my main point is 14yrs tied the Right in knots because many right wing policies clash with one another – Neo-Liberalism vs Little England; free-market vs need for national training plan to wean us off immigration etc

Jerry Carroll
Jerry Carroll
7 months ago
Reply to  R Wright

In fact, the Blob has acquired even more powers of obstruction.

Hugh Bryant
HB
Hugh Bryant
7 months ago
Reply to  j watson

This idea that we were somehow ‘leading’ in Europe is the most delusional of all remainer delusions, I’m afraid.

R Wright
R Wright
7 months ago
Reply to  j watson

I have seen no right wing policies be implemented in 14 years. What power?

Derek Smith
DS
Derek Smith
7 months ago
Reply to  Mark Goodhand

Ironically, the Remainers should be very thankful for Brexit for this reason alone.

j watson
j watson
7 months ago
Reply to  Mark Goodhand

‘Woe is me’. Tories and the Right will have had 14 years in power and still looking for excuses rather than proper, intelligent reflection on the inherent contradictions in their projects and over fixation on slogans rather than competent government. Isn’t it all rather pathetic and snowflakey? ‘It’s not fair, someone else to blame etc’
Of course with a number of right leaning Governments within Europe and EU, yet none (yes, none) seeking to leave, the stupidity of Brexit just further illuminated. We could have been leading a new direction had we not stropped off.

Mark Goodhand
Mark Goodhand
7 months ago

It’s tragic that Britain is heading towards a decade or more of Labour-led status quo decline just as governments on the continent are waking up to the problems of uncontrolled immigration and Net Zero.
Brexit aside, we never escaped New Labour, and we’re as desperate for change as we were in 2010.

Matt M
MM
Matt M
7 months ago

On immigration, I will believe it when I see it.
In Britain, we can see how hard it is to reduce legal and illegal immigration even when you are outside the EU. We have a government that knows it cannot get re-elected if it doesn’t Stop the Boats and yet the situation continues to spiral out of control. On legal immigration, it has done nothing but sloganeer despite having control over the visa regime.
But while you are in the EU you have open borders between the 27 countries, undefended borders around the EU and a, soon to begin, illegal immigrant sharing policy, which means a rich country like Sweden will be forced to accept 10s of thousands of the migrants washing ashore in Spain, Greece and Italy. I do not see how any of these countries manages numbers at all until the EU (and the Council of Europe/ECHR) figures out a way to stop illegal immigration (which seems a long way off) or these countries go their own way.

Katharine Eyre
Katharine Eyre
7 months ago
Reply to  Matt M

I think you might be conflating Schengen and the EU in your comment somewhat but the point is valid that the EU is going to have an immensely tough time reducing illegal immigration.
Sweden might have some tough policies on immigration now, but they’re also fortunate that the German government still has its head in the clouds as far as immigration is concerned. Unless they have family somewhere already, I think migrants will just head to where they believe they’ll have most luck – and with the traffic-light coalition, Germany is still looking a better bet than Sweden.
I’ve got the feeling this is going to change quite dramatically in the medium term though as Germans are basically fed up to the back teeth – and then Sweden might begin to feel the heat again. However: Germany turning might also be the final tipping point in the EU for putting together a proper coordinated policy for rigourously defending its outer borders (from which the UK will also benefit).

Last edited 7 months ago by Katharine Eyre
Nicola Zahorak
NZ
Nicola Zahorak
7 months ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

But are Germans really fed up? We have German friends and they usually give us a hard time about our ‘far right’ leader (I live in Hungary) That said, I have a German friend who lives here, and she said that many German people keep their real opinions to themselves regarding issues such as immigration, for fear of being called racist.

Nicola Zahorak
Nicola Zahorak
7 months ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

But are Germans really fed up? We have German friends and they usually give us a hard time about our ‘far right’ leader (I live in Hungary) That said, I have a German friend who lives here, and she said that many German people keep their real opinions to themselves regarding issues such as immigration, for fear of being called racist.

j watson
j watson
7 months ago
Reply to  Matt M

As last some recognition illegal migration v difficult to manage and unaffected by slogans.
I think we are beginning to recognise too if Europe/EU struggles with it we inevitably will too. So jointly we have to hit the source of the problem hard and together – the traffickers. We then need a half competent processing system and more return deals. A Rwanda or Ascension Island may have a tiny role, but that’ll be it so let’s waste less time fixating on that.
Legal migration? Of course the continual reliance on large numbers because we lack a proper industrial and training national strategy because the Right don’t want to face the contradiction – the free market is not coming to their rescue. 14 years of wasted time, and arguably in large part because Right wing supporters have gobbled up slogans and ‘red meat’ rather than being much more pointed in asking where is the ‘substance’. I know alot of Right leaning supporters want to divorce themselves of any blame for the shambles but unfortunately are they not entirely complicit because they bought the nonsense and lack of substance for too long?

Hugh Bryant
Hugh Bryant
7 months ago
Reply to  j watson

I think you should stop using this term ‘the Right’. It has become meaningless. You are clearly someone with a strongly corporatist point of view, but people on here don’t habitually call you the pejorative most closely associated with that ideology.
We are not ‘the Right’, we are democrats. We believe that governments should serve the people, not the other way around. We are not represented in Parliament, which is an institution entirely populated with people who share your preference for bureaucratic elitism. So it’s both obfuscatory and disingenuous to try and blame us for the country’s problems. Those are entirely the consequence of your Blairism, not our desire for democratic accountability.

Chipoko
Chipoko
7 months ago
Reply to  Hugh Bryant

Hear! Hear!

Rocky Martiano
Rocky Martiano
7 months ago
Reply to  Hugh Bryant

Poor old JW is still obsessed by the Right/Left divide which ceased to have any relevance towards the end of the 20th century.
We don’t want left or right, we just want competent government which improves the lives of all citizens of this country and puts that objective ahead of meddling in endless foreign wars, fantasy net zero policies and pandering to race/gender extremists who represent a tiny minority of the population.

j watson
JW
j watson
7 months ago
Reply to  Rocky Martiano

You’re sounding almost ‘centrist’ there Rock. Welcome.

Andrew F
AF
Andrew F
7 months ago
Reply to  Rocky Martiano

I am sorry, but left right division is still quite clear even in 2023
1) less state intervention in business but controlling monopolies.
2) supporting traditional family values.
3) stopping mass immigration, so no open borders.
4) education system teaching achievements of the Western culture instead of diet of CRT, multi culti and gender idiocies.
There are many other differences but pretending they don’t exist is mad.

Kat L
Kat L
7 months ago
Reply to  Andrew F

Truth. Not recognizing it makes it all so much worse.

Kat L
Kat L
7 months ago
Reply to  Andrew F

Truth. Not recognizing it makes it all so much worse.

S Smith
S Smith
7 months ago
Reply to  Rocky Martiano

I also agree. There is far more commonality between the populist-right and the populist-left in America than, say, the commonalities between the populist-left and mainstream American liberals.
I think where things diverge the most, for me at least, is on issues of war and peace. I’m 100% with the American Libertarians and some segments even of the right on this; our wars of “liberal interventionism” have led to two things 1) a vast enriching of a tiny percentage of American elites and a consolidation of power among those elites and 2) misery for nearly everyone else across the globe, including American citizens are are paying out their nose right now for our proxy war in Ukraine. 
This is where Bobby Jr. gains traction for me and millions of other erstwhile leftists. Although many of us remain environmentalists and have nuanced views on immigration and issues regarding the welfare state; we are steadfastly opposed to further expansion of NATO for instance, under the aegis of American leadership. This is corruption at its worst.  

j watson
j watson
7 months ago
Reply to  Rocky Martiano

You’re sounding almost ‘centrist’ there Rock. Welcome.

Andrew F
AF
Andrew F
7 months ago
Reply to  Rocky Martiano

I am sorry, but left right division is still quite clear even in 2023
1) less state intervention in business but controlling monopolies.
2) supporting traditional family values.
3) stopping mass immigration, so no open borders.
4) education system teaching achievements of the Western culture instead of diet of CRT, multi culti and gender idiocies.
There are many other differences but pretending they don’t exist is mad.

S Smith
S Smith
7 months ago
Reply to  Rocky Martiano

I also agree. There is far more commonality between the populist-right and the populist-left in America than, say, the commonalities between the populist-left and mainstream American liberals.
I think where things diverge the most, for me at least, is on issues of war and peace. I’m 100% with the American Libertarians and some segments even of the right on this; our wars of “liberal interventionism” have led to two things 1) a vast enriching of a tiny percentage of American elites and a consolidation of power among those elites and 2) misery for nearly everyone else across the globe, including American citizens are are paying out their nose right now for our proxy war in Ukraine. 
This is where Bobby Jr. gains traction for me and millions of other erstwhile leftists. Although many of us remain environmentalists and have nuanced views on immigration and issues regarding the welfare state; we are steadfastly opposed to further expansion of NATO for instance, under the aegis of American leadership. This is corruption at its worst.  

j watson
JW
j watson
7 months ago
Reply to  Hugh Bryant

Democrat but don’t like Parliamentary Government even with an 80 seat Tory Majority? Bear in mind a much greater proportion of the country voted for other Parties in 2019 but we have a ‘first past the post’ system. As a Democrat what form of democracy do you think is lacking and how would it function? Now if you are for PR then fair credit to you, but suspect you are not.
And furthermore a pretty Hard Brexit which did not strike the correct balance – county was more for a soft Brexit IMO, but the options of how Brexit would look never put to us (and we did have to leave).
I suspect you are a bit too tribal and not actually of a mind that democracy will always be imperfect and involves some compromise.
As regards Blair – 16 years ago. I’m constantly bemused how often UnHerd regulars drag this guy up from the dead. You credit more influence than he deserves.

Hugh Bryant
HB
Hugh Bryant
7 months ago
Reply to  j watson

If straw men were soldiers you could rule the world.

“As a Democrat what form of democracy do you think is lacking and how would it function? “

No decision that can be made by the Parish Council should be made by the Borough Council. No decision that can be made by the Borough Council should be made by the County Council. And no decision that can be made by the County Council should be made by the State. Above all, no decision that can be made at the nation state level should be made by Goldman Sachs or Ursula von der Leyen.
Land tax collected and spend locally. With full and detailed accountability.
And yes, PR at every level.

As regards Blair – 16 years ago. I’m constantly bemused how often UnHerd regulars drag this guy up from the dead. You credit more influence than he deserves.

His undying influence is evident in every post you write.

Hugh Bryant
HB
Hugh Bryant
7 months ago
Reply to  j watson

If straw men were soldiers you could rule the world.

“As a Democrat what form of democracy do you think is lacking and how would it function? “

No decision that can be made by the Parish Council should be made by the Borough Council. No decision that can be made by the Borough Council should be made by the County Council. And no decision that can be made by the County Council should be made by the State. Above all, no decision that can be made at the nation state level should be made by Ursula von der Leyen or some madman on a mountain in Switzerland.
Land tax collected and spend locally. With full and detailed accountability.
And yes, PR at every level.

As regards Blair – 16 years ago. I’m constantly bemused how often UnHerd regulars drag this guy up from the dead. You credit more influence than he deserves.

His undying influence is evident in every post you write.

Hugh Bryant
Hugh Bryant
7 months ago
Reply to  j watson

If straw men were soldiers you could rule the world.

“As a Democrat what form of democracy do you think is lacking and how would it function? “

No decision that can be made by the Parish Council should be made by the Borough Council. No decision that can be made by the Borough Council should be made by the County Council. And no decision that can be made by the County Council should be made by the State. Above all, no decision that can be made at the nation state level should be made by Goldman Sachs or Ursula von der Leyen.
Land tax collected and spend locally. With full and detailed accountability.
And yes, PR at every level.

As regards Blair – 16 years ago. I’m constantly bemused how often UnHerd regulars drag this guy up from the dead. You credit more influence than he deserves.

His undying influence is evident in every post you write.

Hugh Bryant
Hugh Bryant
7 months ago
Reply to  j watson

If straw men were soldiers you could rule the world.

“As a Democrat what form of democracy do you think is lacking and how would it function? “

No decision that can be made by the Parish Council should be made by the Borough Council. No decision that can be made by the Borough Council should be made by the County Council. And no decision that can be made by the County Council should be made by the State. Above all, no decision that can be made at the nation state level should be made by Ursula von der Leyen or some madman on a mountain in Switzerland.
Land tax collected and spend locally. With full and detailed accountability.
And yes, PR at every level.

As regards Blair – 16 years ago. I’m constantly bemused how often UnHerd regulars drag this guy up from the dead. You credit more influence than he deserves.

His undying influence is evident in every post you write.

Chipoko
C
Chipoko
7 months ago
Reply to  Hugh Bryant

Hear! Hear!

Rocky Martiano
Rocky Martiano
7 months ago
Reply to  Hugh Bryant

Poor old JW is still obsessed by the Right/Left divide which ceased to have any relevance towards the end of the 20th century.
We don’t want left or right, we just want competent government which improves the lives of all citizens of this country and puts that objective ahead of meddling in endless foreign wars, fantasy net zero policies and pandering to race/gender extremists who represent a tiny minority of the population.

j watson
JW
j watson
7 months ago
Reply to  Hugh Bryant

Democrat but don’t like Parliamentary Government even with an 80 seat Tory Majority? Bear in mind a much greater proportion of the country voted for other Parties in 2019 but we have a ‘first past the post’ system. As a Democrat what form of democracy do you think is lacking and how would it function? Now if you are for PR then fair credit to you, but suspect you are not.
And furthermore a pretty Hard Brexit which did not strike the correct balance – county was more for a soft Brexit IMO, but the options of how Brexit would look never put to us (and we did have to leave).
I suspect you are a bit too tribal and not actually of a mind that democracy will always be imperfect and involves some compromise.
As regards Blair – 16 years ago. I’m constantly bemused how often UnHerd regulars drag this guy up from the dead. You credit more influence than he deserves.

Hugh Bryant
HB
Hugh Bryant
7 months ago
Reply to  j watson

I think you should stop using this term ‘the Right’. It has become meaningless. You are clearly someone with a strongly corporatist point of view, but people on here don’t habitually call you the pejorative most closely associated with that ideology.
We are not ‘the Right’, we are democrats. We believe that governments should serve the people, not the other way around. We are not represented in Parliament, which is an institution entirely populated with people who share your preference for bureaucratic elitism. So it’s both obfuscatory and disingenuous to try and blame us for the country’s problems. Those are entirely the consequence of your Blairism, not our desire for democratic accountability.

Andrew F
AF
Andrew F
7 months ago
Reply to  Matt M

Solution is known and simple.
What Europe lacks is the will:
Sink the boats in Mediterranean.
For those of more squeamish disposition let’s tow them back to coast of Africa.
Or pay authorities or gangs or whoever to stop the crossings.
Much cheaper than having savages here.

Nuala Rosher
Nuala Rosher
7 months ago
Reply to  Andrew F

Seize the charity ships that enable migration to Iraly

Sue Sims
SS
Sue Sims
7 months ago
Reply to  Nuala Rosher

I was puzzled for a second or two, wondering how charity shops could enable migration anywhere.

Sue Sims
Sue Sims
7 months ago
Reply to  Nuala Rosher

I was puzzled for a second or two, wondering how charity shops could enable migration anywhere.

Nuala Rosher
Nuala Rosher
7 months ago
Reply to  Andrew F

Seize the charity ships that enable migration to Iraly

Katharine Eyre
KE
Katharine Eyre
7 months ago
Reply to  Matt M

I think you might be conflating Schengen and the EU in your comment somewhat but the point is valid that the EU is going to have an immensely tough time reducing illegal immigration.
Sweden might have some tough policies on immigration now, but they’re also fortunate that the German government still has its head in the clouds as far as immigration is concerned. Unless they have family somewhere already, I think migrants will just head to where they believe they’ll have most luck – and with the traffic-light coalition, Germany is still looking a better bet than Sweden.
I’ve got the feeling this is going to change quite dramatically in the medium term though as Germans are basically fed up to the back teeth – and then Sweden might begin to feel the heat again. However: Germany turning might also be the final tipping point in the EU for putting together a proper coordinated policy for rigourously defending its outer borders (from which the UK will also benefit).

Last edited 7 months ago by Katharine Eyre
j watson
j watson
7 months ago
Reply to  Matt M

As last some recognition illegal migration v difficult to manage and unaffected by slogans.
I think we are beginning to recognise too if Europe/EU struggles with it we inevitably will too. So jointly we have to hit the source of the problem hard and together – the traffickers. We then need a half competent processing system and more return deals. A Rwanda or Ascension Island may have a tiny role, but that’ll be it so let’s waste less time fixating on that.
Legal migration? Of course the continual reliance on large numbers because we lack a proper industrial and training national strategy because the Right don’t want to face the contradiction – the free market is not coming to their rescue. 14 years of wasted time, and arguably in large part because Right wing supporters have gobbled up slogans and ‘red meat’ rather than being much more pointed in asking where is the ‘substance’. I know alot of Right leaning supporters want to divorce themselves of any blame for the shambles but unfortunately are they not entirely complicit because they bought the nonsense and lack of substance for too long?

Andrew F
AF
Andrew F
7 months ago
Reply to  Matt M

Solution is known and simple.
What Europe lacks is the will:
Sink the boats in Mediterranean.
For those of more squeamish disposition let’s tow them back to coast of Africa.
Or pay authorities or gangs or whoever to stop the crossings.
Much cheaper than having savages here.

Matt M
Matt M
7 months ago

On immigration, I will believe it when I see it.
In Britain, we can see how hard it is to reduce legal and illegal immigration even when you are outside the EU. We have a government that knows it cannot get re-elected if it doesn’t Stop the Boats and yet the situation continues to spiral out of control. On legal immigration, it has done nothing but sloganeer despite having control over the visa regime.
But while you are in the EU you have open borders between the 27 countries, undefended borders around the EU and a, soon to begin, illegal immigrant sharing policy, which means a rich country like Sweden will be forced to accept 10s of thousands of the migrants washing ashore in Spain, Greece and Italy. I do not see how any of these countries manages numbers at all until the EU (and the Council of Europe/ECHR) figures out a way to stop illegal immigration (which seems a long way off) or these countries go their own way.

John Riordan
JR
John Riordan
7 months ago

Can we have some of that here please?

John Riordan
JR
John Riordan
7 months ago

Can we have some of that here please?

Rasmus Fogh
Rasmus Fogh
7 months ago

Something similar has arguably been happening in Denmark for years – at lest on immigration. There, too, right wing populist anti-immigration parties (Fremskridtspartiet, Dansk Folkeparti) have pushed for a hard line on immigration, and helped implement it in part through supporting coalition governments, in part by scaring other parties into toughening their immigration policy to avoid being outcompeted – most lately the Labour party (Socialdemokratiet). You could argue that it is a way that a consensus culture and a proportional electoral system adjusts to give the electorate what they want.

Steve Jolly
SJ
Steve Jolly
7 months ago
Reply to  Rasmus Fogh

In any democratic system, it is difficult to fully suppress the public will. In America, the individual states have begun dealing with migrants differently as well and the federal government, divided as it is, can do little to stop them. The populist wave is going to be too much for the elites to stop. They can’t import enough people fast enough to stop what’s coming.

Last edited 7 months ago by Steve Jolly
Andrew F
Andrew F
7 months ago
Reply to  Steve Jolly

But America is United STATES….
Apart from Germany no other European country has the structure with so much autonomy for the regions.
So situation is quite different.

Kat L
KL
Kat L
7 months ago
Reply to  Steve Jolly

I don’t know if anything will actually happen if trump is the nominee. If he weren’t in would be much more likely a landslide but as it is…The rubicon has been crossed with these ridiculous prosecutions, if we can’t pull it out this time the country will be over.

Andrew F
Andrew F
7 months ago
Reply to  Steve Jolly

But America is United STATES….
Apart from Germany no other European country has the structure with so much autonomy for the regions.
So situation is quite different.

Kat L
KL
Kat L
7 months ago
Reply to  Steve Jolly

I don’t know if anything will actually happen if trump is the nominee. If he weren’t in would be much more likely a landslide but as it is…The rubicon has been crossed with these ridiculous prosecutions, if we can’t pull it out this time the country will be over.

Andrew F
Andrew F
7 months ago
Reply to  Rasmus Fogh

Yes, I have Danish neighbours and thay say similar tales.
Problem is if you proposed Danish policies in uk you would be called racist.
Strangely enough most of my lefty acquaintances in London think that Scandinavia is Socialist paradise and uk is racist country.

Steve Jolly
SJ
Steve Jolly
7 months ago
Reply to  Rasmus Fogh

In any democratic system, it is difficult to fully suppress the public will. In America, the individual states have begun dealing with migrants differently as well and the federal government, divided as it is, can do little to stop them. The populist wave is going to be too much for the elites to stop. They can’t import enough people fast enough to stop what’s coming.

Last edited 7 months ago by Steve Jolly
Andrew F
Andrew F
7 months ago
Reply to  Rasmus Fogh

Yes, I have Danish neighbours and thay say similar tales.
Problem is if you proposed Danish policies in uk you would be called racist.
Strangely enough most of my lefty acquaintances in London think that Scandinavia is Socialist paradise and uk is racist country.

Rasmus Fogh
RF
Rasmus Fogh
7 months ago

Something similar has arguably been happening in Denmark for years – at lest on immigration. There, too, right wing populist anti-immigration parties (Fremskridtspartiet, Dansk Folkeparti) have pushed for a hard line on immigration, and helped implement it in part through supporting coalition governments, in part by scaring other parties into toughening their immigration policy to avoid being outcompeted – most lately the Labour party (Socialdemokratiet). You could argue that it is a way that a consensus culture and a proportional electoral system adjusts to give the electorate what they want.

Andrew Buckley
AB
Andrew Buckley
7 months ago

Heresy! How can you write anything positive about any regime to the right of Neo-Marxism?

Andrew Buckley
Andrew Buckley
7 months ago

Heresy! How can you write anything positive about any regime to the right of Neo-Marxism?

Tyler Durden
TD
Tyler Durden
7 months ago

Yet people in Swedish housing projects and the schools/services that cater for them are still getting to be stuck with Somalian gangs throwing hand grenades at them for x number of years. All of the rest sounds like hype in the usual coalition system..

Tyler Durden
Tyler Durden
7 months ago

Yet people in Swedish housing projects and the schools/services that cater for them are still getting to be stuck with Somalian gangs throwing hand grenades at them for x number of years. All of the rest sounds like hype in the usual coalition system..

Samuel Ross
Samuel Ross
7 months ago

All you have to do is kick them out. No need to discourage them politely. Just pack them in buses and drop them off at the border, with a firm shove down the road.

Andrew F
Andrew F
7 months ago
Reply to  Samuel Ross

Well, how does that works. Sweden only has 3 borders.
I agree that Sweden should pay Denmark back.
My Danish neighbours told me that their police intentionally allow immigrants across the bridge to Sweden.

Andrew F
AF
Andrew F
7 months ago
Reply to  Samuel Ross

Well, how does that works. Sweden only has 3 borders.
I agree that Sweden should pay Denmark back.
My Danish neighbours told me that their police intentionally allow immigrants across the bridge to Sweden.

Samuel Ross
SR
Samuel Ross
7 months ago

All you have to do is kick them out. No need to discourage them politely. Just pack them in buses and drop them off at the border, with a firm shove down the road.

Peter Kwasi-Modo
PP
Peter Kwasi-Modo
7 months ago

Sweden’s immigration went UP last year (2021: 90,631; 2022: 102,436). Until 2021, immigration had been decreasing, year on year, since 2016.
Similarly, grants of asylum for refugees in Sweden went UP last year. (2021: 2,955; 2022: 3,395). Before that, grants of asylum had gone down every year since 2016, thanks to a more restricitve asylum law passed in 2016 (i.e. before the present government came to power).
The elite in both the UK and Europe are pro-mass immigration and they have created a Gordian knot of legislation, protocols, treaties and conventions precisely to prevent control. Unless there is the political will to unravel the whole lot, it is hardly worth trying.

Peter Kwasi-Modo
Peter Kwasi-Modo
7 months ago

Sweden’s immigration went UP last year (2021: 90,631; 2022: 102,436). Until 2021, immigration had been decreasing, year on year, since 2016.
Similarly, grants of asylum for refugees in Sweden went UP last year. (2021: 2,955; 2022: 3,395). Before that, grants of asylum had gone down every year since 2016, thanks to a more restricitve asylum law passed in 2016 (i.e. before the present government came to power).
The elite in both the UK and Europe are pro-mass immigration and they have created a Gordian knot of legislation, protocols, treaties and conventions precisely to prevent control. Unless there is the political will to unravel the whole lot, it is hardly worth trying.

Steve Jolly
SJ
Steve Jolly
7 months ago

It has begun. The populist wave is building momentum. It cannot be stopped, and it will sweep away any who try to stand against it. When it succeeds in Italy and Sweden, other populations will take note, and it will grow as people recognize a better way when they see it.

Steve Jolly
Steve Jolly
7 months ago

It has begun. The populist wave is building momentum. It cannot be stopped, and it will sweep away any who try to stand against it. When it succeeds in Italy and Sweden, other populations will take note, and it will grow as people recognize a better way when they see it.

William Cameron
WC
William Cameron
7 months ago

The UK govt has caused huge numbers of immigration arrivals. Their motive has been to provide cheap labour for commerce. And dump the social costs on the state without providing the extra resources needed . So effectively the rich have got richer and everyone else has got a lot poorer.
The Next govt needs to look at the wider picture. It’s no good increasing the labour force if at the same time you increase the demands on the NHS, schools etc by a cost greater than the value added by the worker.

Andrew F
Andrew F
7 months ago

Next government?
Is not Labour proposing votes for 16 years old and non citizens?
I am sure it is done to limit immigration.

Andrew F
AF
Andrew F
7 months ago

Next government?
Is not Labour proposing votes for 16 years old and non citizens?
I am sure it is done to limit immigration.

William Cameron
WC
William Cameron
7 months ago

The UK govt has caused huge numbers of immigration arrivals. Their motive has been to provide cheap labour for commerce. And dump the social costs on the state without providing the extra resources needed . So effectively the rich have got richer and everyone else has got a lot poorer.
The Next govt needs to look at the wider picture. It’s no good increasing the labour force if at the same time you increase the demands on the NHS, schools etc by a cost greater than the value added by the worker.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
7 months ago

Hallelujah! Yet another false dawn!

Charles Stanhope
CS
Charles Stanhope
7 months ago

Hallelujah! Yet another false dawn!

Andrew F
AF
Andrew F
7 months ago

I would say success would be not just stopping import of low IQ savages from unsuccessful countries (I can not use Trump phrase because it will be censored) but actual policy of exporting those already there.
Starting with gangsters.
Like in uk, surely Swedish authorities know who they are.
What they lack is will to deal with the problem.
Deploy army and special forces to eliminate gangsters.

Andrew F
AF
Andrew F
7 months ago

I would say success would be not just stopping import of low IQ savages from unsuccessful countries (I can not use Trump phrase because it will be censored) but actual policy of exporting those already there.
Starting with gangsters.
Like in uk, surely Swedish authorities know who they are.
What they lack is will to deal with the problem.
Deploy army and special forces to eliminate gangsters.

Graff von Frankenheim
Graff von Frankenheim
7 months ago

It can’t be called right-wing if mass deportation of immigrants is ruled out. Without such deportation, the Swedish example is more like centrist managerialism.

Last edited 7 months ago by Graff von Frankenheim
Graff von Frankenheim
Graff von Frankenheim
7 months ago

It can’t be called right-wing if mass deportation of immigrants is ruled out. Without such deportation, the Swedish example is more like centrist managerialism.

Last edited 7 months ago by Graff von Frankenheim
Simon Neale
Simon Neale
7 months ago

Glöm det! Låt oss skruva fast stalldörren!
Never mind! Let’s bolt that stable door!

Andrew F
AF
Andrew F
7 months ago
Reply to  Simon Neale

I am not sure this analogy is appropriate in this case.
We have problem with people coming in not people getting out?

Andrew F
Andrew F
7 months ago
Reply to  Simon Neale

I am not sure this analogy is appropriate in this case.
We have problem with people coming in not people getting out?

Simon Neale
Simon Neale
7 months ago

Glöm det! Låt oss skruva fast stalldörren!
Never mind! Let’s bolt that stable door!

UnHerd Reader
UnHerd Reader
7 months ago

Can we have right wing government in the UK please. All we’ve got at the moment is a far left government that will almost certainly be replaced by another far left government at the next election. And, boy, is the country suffering!

UnHerd Reader
UnHerd Reader
7 months ago

Can we have right wing government in the UK please. All we’ve got at the moment is a far left government that will almost certainly be replaced by another far left government at the next election. And, boy, is the country suffering!

Arkadian X
AA
Arkadian X
7 months ago

I would curb the enthusiasm. I don’t know about Sweden, but in Italy I don’t see that much is changing. The article linked is dated 20/04 (didn’t read it, because paywalled), so perhaps a more recent resource would have been a better choice.

Arkadian X
AA
Arkadian X
7 months ago

I would curb the enthusiasm. I don’t know about Sweden, but in Italy I don’t see that much is changing. The article linked is dated 20/04 (didn’t read it, because paywalled), so perhaps a more recent resource would have been a better choice.

William Cameron
William Cameron
7 months ago

Politicians have lied to the voters. Promising to reduce immigration while actively encouraging it and doing nothing to stop illegal immigration.
Business benefits from cheap labour, but the tax payer pays the huge cost of extra services for the increased numbers. No low paid low tax paying person is a net contributor to the economy.

William Cameron
WC
William Cameron
7 months ago

Politicians have lied to the voters. Promising to reduce immigration while actively encouraging it and doing nothing to stop illegal immigration.
Business benefits from cheap labour, but the tax payer pays the huge cost of extra services for the increased numbers. No low paid low tax paying person is a net contributor to the economy.

Jerry Carroll
Jerry Carroll
7 months ago

The Dumb Swedes have become the Smart Swedes thanks to Angela Merkel.

Jerry Carroll
JC
Jerry Carroll
7 months ago

The Dumb Swedes have become the Smart Swedes thanks to Angela Merkel.

Andrew Stoll
Andrew Stoll
7 months ago

It’s time to unherd and shed the negative connotations of the term ‘Right wing – Left wing’ and look at politics from a more ‘inclusive’ perspective. Common sense over ideology, mindful conservatism over gung-ho progressiveness in all camps. Perhaps that’s where trends are heading?

Andrew Stoll
AS
Andrew Stoll
7 months ago

It’s time to unherd and shed the negative connotations of the term ‘Right wing – Left wing’ and look at politics from a more ‘inclusive’ perspective. Common sense over ideology, mindful conservatism over gung-ho progressiveness in all camps. Perhaps that’s where trends are heading?

Andrew Stoll
AS
Andrew Stoll
7 months ago

Political parties, especially Labour and Greens build up their future voter base by accepting or promoting high numbers of low IQ immigration

j watson
j watson
7 months ago

Firstly there is no ‘EU dogma’ on Nuclear energy. In fact in 2022 it moved to formally count Nuclear as Green. Of course some in Europe disagree with that, but no need for the poor journalism where false impression created of what actually the EU has said. Silly.
On immigration – bring it on. I’m sure many would welcome similar basic Swedish competency.
And recently requested to join NATO which will happen, whilst also reiterating sent £2.2b of aid to Ukraine and believe Ukraine should be part of EU family.
Lot to be said for these Swedes..

Robbie K
Robbie K
7 months ago
Reply to  j watson

Firstly there is no ‘EU dogma’ on Nuclear energy.

Seems the author got things in a twist there – as you suggest, nuclear is the solution to the energy and climate crisis and the Swedish policy is a great example.

John Riordan
John Riordan
7 months ago
Reply to  j watson

In fact the 2022 move by the EU to include nuclear as green was a reversal of an ignorant dogma that held otherwise. The dogma in question certainly existed as a consensus until then, and given how controversial it still is, it’s clear the dogma isn’t dead.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
7 months ago
Reply to  John Riordan

Did the wonderful James Ephraim Lovelock CH CBE FRS (26 July 1919 – 26 July 2022) live to see that do you know?

Ian Barton
Ian Barton
7 months ago
Reply to  John Riordan

Absolutely – utterly idiotic of the EU (AKA Germany v4.0) to not consider nuclear as green decades ago.

Last edited 7 months ago by Ian Barton
Andrew F
Andrew F
7 months ago
Reply to  Ian Barton

Do you mean Fourth Reich?

Ian Barton
IB
Ian Barton
7 months ago
Reply to  Andrew F

Yes – but phrased for the modern era.

Last edited 7 months ago by Ian Barton
Ian Barton
Ian Barton
7 months ago
Reply to  Andrew F

Yes – but phrased for the modern era.

Last edited 7 months ago by Ian Barton
Andrew F
Andrew F
7 months ago
Reply to  Ian Barton

Do you mean Fourth Reich?

j watson
JW
j watson
7 months ago
Reply to  John Riordan

Indeed, and despite the mythology Germany controls everything, the EU correctly IMO changed course. The ability to change one’s mind a strength and not a dogma.

John Riordan
JR
John Riordan
7 months ago
Reply to  j watson

Yes, but this happened in 2022! How many decades late to a correct decision does it take for you to admit that there was a problem?

John Riordan
JR
John Riordan
7 months ago
Reply to  j watson

Yes, but this happened in 2022! How many decades late to a correct decision does it take for you to admit that there was a problem?

Charles Stanhope
CS
Charles Stanhope
7 months ago
Reply to  John Riordan

Did the wonderful James Ephraim Lovelock CH CBE FRS (26 July 1919 – 26 July 2022) live to see that do you know?

Ian Barton
IB
Ian Barton
7 months ago
Reply to  John Riordan

Absolutely – utterly idiotic of the EU (AKA Germany v4.0) to not consider nuclear as green decades ago.

Last edited 7 months ago by Ian Barton
j watson
j watson
7 months ago
Reply to  John Riordan

Indeed, and despite the mythology Germany controls everything, the EU correctly IMO changed course. The ability to change one’s mind a strength and not a dogma.

Robbie K
Robbie K
7 months ago
Reply to  j watson

Firstly there is no ‘EU dogma’ on Nuclear energy.

Seems the author got things in a twist there – as you suggest, nuclear is the solution to the energy and climate crisis and the Swedish policy is a great example.

John Riordan
JR
John Riordan
7 months ago
Reply to  j watson

In fact the 2022 move by the EU to include nuclear as green was a reversal of an ignorant dogma that held otherwise. The dogma in question certainly existed as a consensus until then, and given how controversial it still is, it’s clear the dogma isn’t dead.

j watson
j watson
7 months ago

Firstly there is no ‘EU dogma’ on Nuclear energy. In fact in 2022 it moved to formally count Nuclear as Green. Of course some in Europe disagree with that, but no need for the poor journalism where false impression created of what actually the EU has said. Silly.
On immigration – bring it on. I’m sure many would welcome similar basic Swedish competency.
And recently requested to join NATO which will happen, whilst also reiterating sent £2.2b of aid to Ukraine and believe Ukraine should be part of EU family.
Lot to be said for these Swedes..