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Football died after Pelé His greatest victory marked the end of the beautiful game

Pelé celebrates Brazil's 1970 victory (Alessandro Sabattini/Getty Images)

Pelé celebrates Brazil's 1970 victory (Alessandro Sabattini/Getty Images)


December 30, 2022   6 mins

In the popular imagination, the 1970 World Cup in Mexico still stands as the apogee of football. Broadcast in colour for the first time, it seemed the height of modernity: even the ball was named Telstar after the satellite that made global transmission possible. Brazil, who won their third World Cup in four, had been on a Nasa fitness training programme before the tournament — so when the Jornal do Brasil claimed that “Brazil’s victory with the ball compares with the conquest of the moon by the Americans” the year before, it didn’t seem wholly ridiculous.

The football they played in iridescent heat on sun-bleached grass that shimmered an unfamiliar green on television screens across the world; the patterns they had found in their vibrant yellow shirts had an artistry about them, a grace that enraptured the world. “Other teams thrill us and make us respect them,” wrote Hugh McIlvanney in the Observer. “The Brazilians at their finest gave us pleasure so natural and deep as to be a vivid physical experience.” Just as the moon landings had been a triumph of human ingenuity, so Brazil’s World Cup win seemed somehow transcendent, a celebration of the best of humanity.

At its heart was Pelé, born Edson Arantes do Nascimento. As a 17-year-old, he had scored twice in the 1958 final as Brazil won their first World Cup. In 1962, as Brazil won again, he had been injured early in the tournament. In 1966, brutal tackling had bullied him and Brazil out in the group stage. Disillusioned, he quit the national side but even after being coaxed back, there had been doubts as to whether he would make the squad in 1970 after the coach João Saldanha began to question his eyesight. But Saldanha was sacked on the eve of the tournament, Pelé was restored and, at 29, he enjoyed his apotheosis.

He scored in the final, a magnificently athletic header, but what is best remembered is his lay-off for the overlapping Carlos Alberto to make it 4-1 in the final seconds, a team goal of mesmerising fluency to crown the tournament. The pause, the timing, the awareness… This was football of the very highest level. Pelé had risen from horrendous poverty to become probably the most revered sportsman on the planet. He was painted by Andy Warhol, who commented that Pelé would have “15 centuries” of fame.

Pelé’s lob from the halfway line against Czechoslovakia; the header that drew the stunning save from Gordon Banks; the dummy on the Uruguay goalkeeper Ladislao Mazurkiewicz — none of them resulted in goals, but that seemed not to matter. This was about more than winning or losing, bureaucratic notches on a scoreboard. It was about the greater glory of being and the game. And there was even perhaps, for those minded to see it, in the famous photograph of him and Bobby Moore exchanging shirts after Brazil had beaten England, an image of racial harmony.

There has been a sense ever since of football trying to recapture the spirit of 1970. The more apt comparison from the previous year is perhaps less the moon landings than Woodstock, a festival of love and artistry that now embodies a moment of lost possibility with Pelé as its pregnant Joan Baez. And yet, like Woodstock, the idealised image of the 1970 World Cup was largely illusory.

The popular conception of Woodstock, great crowds revelling in the possibility of peace while listening to Jimi Hendrix and Creedence Clearwater Revival, stems largely from the over-idealised Michael Woodleigh documentary, released three months before the 1970 World Cup. In reality, it was chaos: several acts performed hours late, anarchists broke down a fence to admit thousands without paying, two people were killed (one run over by a tractor).

The 1970 World Cup, similarly, becomes a much darker event as soon as you peer beyond the brilliance of Brazil’s football. Mexico was ruled by the US-backed Partido Revolucionario Institucional, which was engaged in a constant war with Left-wing student and guerrilla groups. Torture and extrajudicial killings were commonplace: the World Cup fell between two massacres of student demonstrators by government forces, one in 1968 and one in 1971. Brazil itself was under a military dictatorship led by the hard-line General Emílio Médici (that Saldanha was an outspoken Leftist was one of the major reasons for his removal as coach). The World Cup success was, along with short-term economic growth, framed as part of the “Brazilian Miracle” he and his repressive policies had supposedly made possible. To call Pelé a stooge of the regime, as many have, or to criticise him for not speaking out, is perhaps unreasonable — but he was undeniably the face of a major propaganda success for Médici.

And yet, in World Cup terms, 1970 does represent an age of lost innocence. Football can be divided into two eras, ancient and modern, with the moment of transition falling in the mid-Sixties, when it became a game of systems rather than individuals. England won in 1966 because of their pressing and their revolutionary adoption of a rugged 4-4-2 formation. It was functional rather than spectacular and drew criticism from almost everybody (until it worked). Football as a romantic game was over. The 1970 tournament was celebrated as a brave new world of attacking potential; rather it was, even if Brazil were rather better organised than the samba cliché had it, a throwback to what had gone before because the heat and humidity of Mexico made the physical exertion demanded by a systematised game impossible.

But football was changing off the pitch as well as on it. Since 1961, the president of Fifa had been Stanley Rous, a former schoolteacher from Suffolk who had refereed the 1934 FA Cup final. He tended to work from home, making occasional flights to Fifa’s small office in Zurich, and was sceptical about expanding the game beyond its European and South American heartlands. He tried to ignore politics altogether, which in part explains the lack of qualms about the 1970 World Cup being played in Mexico.

That policy, though, never particularly practical, created two major problems. He opposed the ban that had been imposed on apartheid South Africa and then, in 1973, he refused to listen to Soviet protests against playing the second leg of their qualifying play-off against Chile in Santiago’s Estadio Nacional, which was being used as a torture and detention centre by the Pinochet regime after the coup against Salvador Allende.

His clumsy handling of both issues, allied to a perception he was an old-school British colonialist, led to Rous’s defeat in Fifa’s presidential elections shortly before the 1974 World Cup. The man who beat him was the Brazilian João Havelange, the son of an arms dealer who had been an Olympic swimmer. A year later, Havelange appointed as his technical director Sepp Blatter, a Swiss businessman who, while working for Longines, had the revelation that rather than the Olympics paying watch-manufacturers to use their timing apparatus, the watch-manufacturers should pay the Olympics for the exposure. This was a whole new world. The following year, Blatter completed the negotiation of a huge sponsorship deal with Coca-Cola. Football’s commercial age had begun.

Everything in football now is corporate. The ban on beer at the Qatar World Cup and Budweiser’s fury was a rare example of local culture winning out over commerce. And Pelé too was infected: from Puma to Snickers to Viagra to diamonds made by heating his hair under extreme pressure, there was nothing he wouldn’t advertise or monetise. Perhaps it is fitting that one of the last tweets posted from his official account was used to advertise his new clothing range.

Pelé was smooth and charming, a safe pair of hands. His 1970 teammate Tostão has a theory about the use of nicknames in Brazilian football, that the clamour around players makes it useful for stars to split themselves in two: the public figure (the nickname) and the private (the “real” name). For Pelé, he said, that divided self ceased to exist: the mask became the man. “He says that Edson is separate from Pelé, but I don’t see it,” he said in an interview with The Blizzard. “The only one that exists is the public Pelé. He adapted from the age of 15 to becoming a public figure. He passes the impression of never going through depression, anxiety, anguish, sadness as a consequence of loss of identity. He’s happy, well adapted. He’s always smiling and upbeat. You never see him bad tempered. He loves being Pelé.” Even when one of Pelé’s sons was admitted to a drug rehabilitation clinic, it became a public event, something of which Tostão was sharply critical. By coincidence (and it wasn’t planned; I was the editor), on the next page of the magazine was an advert for artwork signed and endorsed by Pelé.

Of course, plenty of people exploit their fame to make money. Nobody should criticise somebody who grew up in the poverty Pelé did for pursuing every opportunity they can. But that doesn’t mean that there cannot be sadness for what he became and what football has become. Amid the dictatorships, there was something beautiful about 1970. The feelings of wonder Brazil and Pelé evoked at the time were not fake, nor should they be invalidated by context: art can flourish in the most brutal of places.

But equally it’s impossible now not to look back at that tournament and see what might have been for football. Perhaps an increased level of tactical complexity was inevitable; it is probably desirable even if it complicates the simple tales of heroes and villains that many still desire. Increasing commercialism was probably also inevitable and has arguably in some ways been beneficial — but, still, in the silent pause before Pelé’s lay-off to Carlos Alberto, in that moment of perfect stillness, there is a glimpse of a better world.


Jonathan Wilson is a columnist for the Guardian and Sports Illustrated, the editor of the Blizzard and author of Angels With Dirty Faces: A Footballing History of Argentina.

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Steve Murray
LL
Steve Murray
1 year ago

I’m pretty sure the author will have had this article ready and waiting for Pele’s death. (I won’t use the modern idiom by writing “Pele’s passing” for obvious reasons!). It’s well-written, and ties in many of the political and wider social changes taking place around the time of the 1970 Final. I’d also add the 1970 General Election ( 3 days beforehand) and the announcement by the Beatles that they’d split up just a couple of months before that – the ending of several eras, in fact.
Wilson is right: it’s unfair to expect sporting greats to take a stand against political oppression. I’d go further and say i wish today’s sporting heroes would keep their opinions slightly more to themselves instead of using a natural talent for hitting or kicking a ball to try to influence political debate. They’re entitled to their opinions, but not undue influence, especially when they can only express such opinions in a fairly crass way.
Watching Pele’s movement and control of a spherical object transcends football, transcends sport. It’s human athleticism incarnate, and was simply a joy to watch.

Steve Murray
LL
Steve Murray
1 year ago

I’m pretty sure the author will have had this article ready and waiting for Pele’s death. (I won’t use the modern idiom by writing “Pele’s passing” for obvious reasons!). It’s well-written, and ties in many of the political and wider social changes taking place around the time of the 1970 Final. I’d also add the 1970 General Election ( 3 days beforehand) and the announcement by the Beatles that they’d split up just a couple of months before that – the ending of several eras, in fact.
Wilson is right: it’s unfair to expect sporting greats to take a stand against political oppression. I’d go further and say i wish today’s sporting heroes would keep their opinions slightly more to themselves instead of using a natural talent for hitting or kicking a ball to try to influence political debate. They’re entitled to their opinions, but not undue influence, especially when they can only express such opinions in a fairly crass way.
Watching Pele’s movement and control of a spherical object transcends football, transcends sport. It’s human athleticism incarnate, and was simply a joy to watch.

Michael Lynch
ML
Michael Lynch
1 year ago

I turned 13 in 1970 and was a football fanatic who was allowed to watch as many of the games as I could by indulgent parents – although my younger brothers were not so lucky. Everything he says about the luminosity of that tournament, the sun, sky, the iridescence of the pitches, the slight delay on the commentary and the occasional jerks in the pictures is correct – and adds to its charm and what now feels an other worldly time. That Brazil side were wonderful, certainly in midfield and attack – although the goalkeeper, Felix, I think, was a bit lairy – and the verve, elan and sheer joy they evoked with their performances still lingers in the memory. They also had powers of recovery, going behind in games (including the final) to win. The politics of the era were becoming apparant, even to a slightly aware North London grammar school boy who was hoping for wider horizons than the opportunities then available , but that World Cup, the sheer, dazzling glory and beauty of it, allowed us all to bask in a summer of pleasure and enjoyment of what probably cemented Brazil’s reputation as the inventors of the ”Jogo Bonito”. The Seventies were, as Wilson says, a decade where systematised football became the paradigm, but even now when we look back at the old footage, the dreadful pitches, the exuberance and spontaneity of crowds, the way the game was played, the savage tackling and the way players more or less used to get on with it, that too looks like another world. I have been a Spurs supporter pretty much all my life but if I returned to London (I have lived in Australia for 35 years) I am not sure I would want to pay the prices charged by Premier League clubs nowadays in the current corporatised game. Maybe I would go and watch the first club I ever saw play live – Hendon, an amateur powerhouse of the 1960s – where my dad took me when I was still at primary school!

Rocky Martiano
RM
Rocky Martiano
1 year ago
Reply to  Michael Lynch

Hendon, amateur powerhouse indeed. My first job in the 1970s was working with Peter Anderson, student accountant by day and dazzling winger for Hendon and Barnet by night. I also grew up watching the sublime Jimmy Greaves, who wouldn’t get a game today because he refused to tackle, much less do a ‘high press’.
I’d argue that the crass commercialism introduced in the 70s (Blatter has a lot to answer for besides corruption) led to the stifling tactical constraints on the modern game. With the huge sums of money at stake, it became more important for the sponsors and the clubs not to lose than to try and win. It amazes me that people accept to pay the ridiculous prices they do today to watch largely turgid exercises in passing the ball backwards and sideways.
At least we occasionally have the spectacle of a genius like Messi or Zidane transcending the current dross to take us back for a while to that golden age.

Andrew Fisher
AF
Andrew Fisher
1 year ago
Reply to  Rocky Martiano

Don Review’s Leeds United? Bertie Mee’s
Arsenal. Thuggish centre backs etc. However nostalgic we might be, footballers along with all other sportsmen, tennis players above all, are much, much fitter and on the whole more talented than those of the 70s. Could an effective drunkard such as George Best last any time at all in.the modern game. (He might do, he’d simply have to sober up or leave the game). They practice more, they don’t go down the pub before and after matches etc. Tactical nous and the design and rules of the game itself often results in ‘boring’ draws. (I don’t believe basketball has a problem with low scores)

However, there are exceptions: the last World Cup Final was as exciting as any in history!

Last edited 1 year ago by Andrew Fisher
Andrew Fisher
AF
Andrew Fisher
1 year ago
Reply to  Rocky Martiano

Don Review’s Leeds United? Bertie Mee’s
Arsenal. Thuggish centre backs etc. However nostalgic we might be, footballers along with all other sportsmen, tennis players above all, are much, much fitter and on the whole more talented than those of the 70s. Could an effective drunkard such as George Best last any time at all in.the modern game. (He might do, he’d simply have to sober up or leave the game). They practice more, they don’t go down the pub before and after matches etc. Tactical nous and the design and rules of the game itself often results in ‘boring’ draws. (I don’t believe basketball has a problem with low scores)

However, there are exceptions: the last World Cup Final was as exciting as any in history!

Last edited 1 year ago by Andrew Fisher
Rocky Martiano
RM
Rocky Martiano
1 year ago
Reply to  Michael Lynch

Hendon, amateur powerhouse indeed. My first job in the 1970s was working with Peter Anderson, student accountant by day and dazzling winger for Hendon and Barnet by night. I also grew up watching the sublime Jimmy Greaves, who wouldn’t get a game today because he refused to tackle, much less do a ‘high press’.
I’d argue that the crass commercialism introduced in the 70s (Blatter has a lot to answer for besides corruption) led to the stifling tactical constraints on the modern game. With the huge sums of money at stake, it became more important for the sponsors and the clubs not to lose than to try and win. It amazes me that people accept to pay the ridiculous prices they do today to watch largely turgid exercises in passing the ball backwards and sideways.
At least we occasionally have the spectacle of a genius like Messi or Zidane transcending the current dross to take us back for a while to that golden age.

Michael Lynch
ML
Michael Lynch
1 year ago

I turned 13 in 1970 and was a football fanatic who was allowed to watch as many of the games as I could by indulgent parents – although my younger brothers were not so lucky. Everything he says about the luminosity of that tournament, the sun, sky, the iridescence of the pitches, the slight delay on the commentary and the occasional jerks in the pictures is correct – and adds to its charm and what now feels an other worldly time. That Brazil side were wonderful, certainly in midfield and attack – although the goalkeeper, Felix, I think, was a bit lairy – and the verve, elan and sheer joy they evoked with their performances still lingers in the memory. They also had powers of recovery, going behind in games (including the final) to win. The politics of the era were becoming apparant, even to a slightly aware North London grammar school boy who was hoping for wider horizons than the opportunities then available , but that World Cup, the sheer, dazzling glory and beauty of it, allowed us all to bask in a summer of pleasure and enjoyment of what probably cemented Brazil’s reputation as the inventors of the ”Jogo Bonito”. The Seventies were, as Wilson says, a decade where systematised football became the paradigm, but even now when we look back at the old footage, the dreadful pitches, the exuberance and spontaneity of crowds, the way the game was played, the savage tackling and the way players more or less used to get on with it, that too looks like another world. I have been a Spurs supporter pretty much all my life but if I returned to London (I have lived in Australia for 35 years) I am not sure I would want to pay the prices charged by Premier League clubs nowadays in the current corporatised game. Maybe I would go and watch the first club I ever saw play live – Hendon, an amateur powerhouse of the 1960s – where my dad took me when I was still at primary school!

Frank McCusker
FM
Frank McCusker
1 year ago

“Mazy dribblers” are almost a thing of the past. Messi still gets away with because of his status in the game, and the rarity of dribbling nowadays means what he does stands out all the more. But what he does was once a common feature of the game. Nowadays, hardly anybody goes on a mazy run and takes on the opposition, man to man, ball at feet. They’d be too afraid of what the coach would say to them after the game, for being so “selfish”. Instead, it’s pass early, retain possession, tika-taka, cross from the wing etc. Of course, it is a team sport, but I remember the glorious selfishness of Best and the magical madness of Maradona, and the conjuring tricks of Zidane and Cruyff, and feel a sense of loss that something anarchic and individualistic has been taken out of the game.  

Rhys Jaggar
RJ
Rhys Jaggar
1 year ago
Reply to  Frank McCusker

Crossing is the biggest victim of the body-building culture of football these days. I genuinely believe that too much muscle bulk makes skilful play more and more impossible. Crossing a ball is not hard, because I could do it as a bumbling amateur 35-40 years ago. But there is hardly anyone in the EPL, paid £50-250k a week, who can cross a ball to a) pass the first defender; b) offer a central striker the chance to head for goal; and c) not have the cross bounce the far side of the penalty area, somewhere in the stands etc.

El Uro
EU
El Uro
1 year ago
Reply to  Frank McCusker

Not certainly in that way. It’s just that the number of brilliants does not increase in proportion to the volume of excavated rock. Magicians like Pele, Maradona, Cruyff, Zidane and, of course, Messi have been and will remain a rarity. And this is good…

Rhys Jaggar
RJ
Rhys Jaggar
1 year ago
Reply to  Frank McCusker

Crossing is the biggest victim of the body-building culture of football these days. I genuinely believe that too much muscle bulk makes skilful play more and more impossible. Crossing a ball is not hard, because I could do it as a bumbling amateur 35-40 years ago. But there is hardly anyone in the EPL, paid £50-250k a week, who can cross a ball to a) pass the first defender; b) offer a central striker the chance to head for goal; and c) not have the cross bounce the far side of the penalty area, somewhere in the stands etc.

El Uro
EU
El Uro
1 year ago
Reply to  Frank McCusker

Not certainly in that way. It’s just that the number of brilliants does not increase in proportion to the volume of excavated rock. Magicians like Pele, Maradona, Cruyff, Zidane and, of course, Messi have been and will remain a rarity. And this is good…

Frank McCusker
FM
Frank McCusker
1 year ago

“Mazy dribblers” are almost a thing of the past. Messi still gets away with because of his status in the game, and the rarity of dribbling nowadays means what he does stands out all the more. But what he does was once a common feature of the game. Nowadays, hardly anybody goes on a mazy run and takes on the opposition, man to man, ball at feet. They’d be too afraid of what the coach would say to them after the game, for being so “selfish”. Instead, it’s pass early, retain possession, tika-taka, cross from the wing etc. Of course, it is a team sport, but I remember the glorious selfishness of Best and the magical madness of Maradona, and the conjuring tricks of Zidane and Cruyff, and feel a sense of loss that something anarchic and individualistic has been taken out of the game.  

Peter B
PB
Peter B
1 year ago

Guardian journalist writing here: “perhaps unreasonable” to expect Pele to speak out against military dictatorship in Brazil.
2022: mandatory for professional footballers to indulge in gesture politics (usually at no cost to themselves). Criticism of anyone not actively supporting the range of “official beliefs” is expected.
Fascinating that people (doubtless most Guardian journalists amongst them) can support both these views at the same time whilst being unaware of any contradictions.
Personally, I don’t buy into the role model stuff or insistence that footballers have any more responsibility than anyone else to take a stand on political issues. That’s a personal choice – as are their own political beliefs.

Steve Murray
LL
Steve Murray
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter B

Absolutely. The idea of footballers as “role models” is just ridiculous. I support a team in League Two of the EFL, and even there, some people regard bang-average journeymen footballers as someone to have their kids look up to. It’s embarrassing.

Tom Graham
TG
Tom Graham
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter B

I would also take issue with the assumption that shooting left-wing students is necessarily a bad thing.

Steve Murray
LL
Steve Murray
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter B

Absolutely. The idea of footballers as “role models” is just ridiculous. I support a team in League Two of the EFL, and even there, some people regard bang-average journeymen footballers as someone to have their kids look up to. It’s embarrassing.

Tom Graham
TG
Tom Graham
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter B

I would also take issue with the assumption that shooting left-wing students is necessarily a bad thing.

Peter B
PB
Peter B
1 year ago

Guardian journalist writing here: “perhaps unreasonable” to expect Pele to speak out against military dictatorship in Brazil.
2022: mandatory for professional footballers to indulge in gesture politics (usually at no cost to themselves). Criticism of anyone not actively supporting the range of “official beliefs” is expected.
Fascinating that people (doubtless most Guardian journalists amongst them) can support both these views at the same time whilst being unaware of any contradictions.
Personally, I don’t buy into the role model stuff or insistence that footballers have any more responsibility than anyone else to take a stand on political issues. That’s a personal choice – as are their own political beliefs.

Steven Campbell
SC
Steven Campbell
1 year ago

Why is it that when a leftist columnist writes about anything, the first thing mentioned is the politics of the host country, especially negative if it is right wing and a total whitewash if it is from the left. In a bit of psychological dive, I detect the same biases regarding the right wing crass commercialization of sport vs. the beautiful game of the barrio where art and beauty emanate.
Did every successful player in the world overcome immense poverty to reach the heights of skill and wealth that footballers have? Says something about capitalism, doesn’t it?
I’m glad Pele was able to capitalize on his skill, more power to Messi, Ibrahimović, Cristiano, and the rest of the millionaires created in the modern game of Futbol.
But, where have you gone, Joe DiMaggio?

El Uro
EU
El Uro
1 year ago

«Why is it that when a leftist columnist writes about anything, the first thing mentioned is the politics»
Seems I know the answer. It’s because they are politically and sexually obsessed at the same time and put their political views into any sphere just like they put their penises into any hole

Graeme McNeil
CS
Graeme McNeil
1 year ago
Reply to  El Uro

Ah, the intellectual heights that you conservatives reach! The beauty of your prose, the elegance of your exposition!

Last edited 1 year ago by Graeme McNeil
Jorge Espinha
JE
Jorge Espinha
1 year ago
Reply to  Graeme McNeil

It wasn’t always like this. But sadly it is like this today. Leftists just stopped thinking around 1968 and all they do is regurgitate hate. It’s very sad.

Jorge Espinha
JE
Jorge Espinha
1 year ago
Reply to  Graeme McNeil

It wasn’t always like this. But sadly it is like this today. Leftists just stopped thinking around 1968 and all they do is regurgitate hate. It’s very sad.

Jorge Espinha
JE
Jorge Espinha
1 year ago
Reply to  El Uro

What was the definition of a fanatic? Someone that doesn’t shut up and doesn’t change the subject

Graeme McNeil
CS
Graeme McNeil
1 year ago
Reply to  El Uro

Ah, the intellectual heights that you conservatives reach! The beauty of your prose, the elegance of your exposition!

Last edited 1 year ago by Graeme McNeil
Jorge Espinha
JE
Jorge Espinha
1 year ago
Reply to  El Uro

What was the definition of a fanatic? Someone that doesn’t shut up and doesn’t change the subject

Tony Price
TP
Tony Price
1 year ago

Why is it that when a rightist BTL commentator writes about anything, the first thing mentioned is the politics of the author, especially negative if it is left wing and a total whitewash if it is from the right.

There you go, I’ve corrected that for you!

Last edited 1 year ago by Tony Price
El Uro
EU
El Uro
1 year ago

«Why is it that when a leftist columnist writes about anything, the first thing mentioned is the politics»
Seems I know the answer. It’s because they are politically and sexually obsessed at the same time and put their political views into any sphere just like they put their penises into any hole

Tony Price
TP
Tony Price
1 year ago

Why is it that when a rightist BTL commentator writes about anything, the first thing mentioned is the politics of the author, especially negative if it is left wing and a total whitewash if it is from the right.

There you go, I’ve corrected that for you!

Last edited 1 year ago by Tony Price
Steven Campbell
SC
Steven Campbell
1 year ago

Why is it that when a leftist columnist writes about anything, the first thing mentioned is the politics of the host country, especially negative if it is right wing and a total whitewash if it is from the left. In a bit of psychological dive, I detect the same biases regarding the right wing crass commercialization of sport vs. the beautiful game of the barrio where art and beauty emanate.
Did every successful player in the world overcome immense poverty to reach the heights of skill and wealth that footballers have? Says something about capitalism, doesn’t it?
I’m glad Pele was able to capitalize on his skill, more power to Messi, Ibrahimović, Cristiano, and the rest of the millionaires created in the modern game of Futbol.
But, where have you gone, Joe DiMaggio?

Samir Iker
SI
Samir Iker
1 year ago

I know not relevant to Pele, but I would argue the beautiful game and “Jogo Bonito” (sure I spelt that wrong, too lazy to check) died not in 1970 but in 1982, with the defeat of that Brazilian midfield.

Last edited 1 year ago by Samir Iker
Jorge Espinha
JE
Jorge Espinha
1 year ago
Reply to  Samir Iker

You get it Samir. The author doesn’t.

Rhys Jaggar
RJ
Rhys Jaggar
1 year ago
Reply to  Samir Iker

I think you should ask yourself why football is only about attacking and not a competition between attack and defence. The Brazil team in 1982 couldn’t defend to save its life against Italy so why should they be handed the world cup just because they were great attackers?

Christopher Barclay
CB
Christopher Barclay
1 year ago
Reply to  Rhys Jaggar

You miss the point. It’s nothing to do with being handed the World Cup. Brazil didn’t change the way that they approached World Cups forever, because of their victory in 1970. They changed it forever, because an equally gifted team lost in 1982. That’s why Samir said it was the end of ‘O Jogo Bonito’. Since 1982, Brazil have gone out to win the tournament and not to play the most beautiful football.

Jorge Espinha
JE
Jorge Espinha
1 year ago
Reply to  Rhys Jaggar

They were close if memory serves me right Italy were benefited by the referee. They did have an horrible goalkeeper

Samir Iker
SI
Samir Iker
1 year ago
Reply to  Jorge Espinha

Not so much about the ref really, Rossi getting into form at just the right time, calamitous errors by Junior and Cerezo that led to two Italian goals, a poor centre forward by their standards..and Italy weren’t really a bad team themselves overall.
Still, sometimes you don’t need to be a winner to be remembered. As with Holland 74 and Hungary 54.
If both Brazil and France has gone through to the final in 82, would have been some game. If…

Samir Iker
SI
Samir Iker
1 year ago
Reply to  Jorge Espinha

Not so much about the ref really, Rossi getting into form at just the right time, calamitous errors by Junior and Cerezo that led to two Italian goals, a poor centre forward by their standards..and Italy weren’t really a bad team themselves overall.
Still, sometimes you don’t need to be a winner to be remembered. As with Holland 74 and Hungary 54.
If both Brazil and France has gone through to the final in 82, would have been some game. If…

Christopher Barclay
CB
Christopher Barclay
1 year ago
Reply to  Rhys Jaggar

You miss the point. It’s nothing to do with being handed the World Cup. Brazil didn’t change the way that they approached World Cups forever, because of their victory in 1970. They changed it forever, because an equally gifted team lost in 1982. That’s why Samir said it was the end of ‘O Jogo Bonito’. Since 1982, Brazil have gone out to win the tournament and not to play the most beautiful football.

Jorge Espinha
JE
Jorge Espinha
1 year ago
Reply to  Rhys Jaggar

They were close if memory serves me right Italy were benefited by the referee. They did have an horrible goalkeeper

Jorge Espinha
JE
Jorge Espinha
1 year ago
Reply to  Samir Iker

You get it Samir. The author doesn’t.

Rhys Jaggar
RJ
Rhys Jaggar
1 year ago
Reply to  Samir Iker

I think you should ask yourself why football is only about attacking and not a competition between attack and defence. The Brazil team in 1982 couldn’t defend to save its life against Italy so why should they be handed the world cup just because they were great attackers?

Samir Iker
SI
Samir Iker
1 year ago

I know not relevant to Pele, but I would argue the beautiful game and “Jogo Bonito” (sure I spelt that wrong, too lazy to check) died not in 1970 but in 1982, with the defeat of that Brazilian midfield.

Last edited 1 year ago by Samir Iker
Jorge Espinha
JE
Jorge Espinha
1 year ago

Yet another article that doesn’t deliver what promises in the title. I thought I was going to read about the fundamental way football changed with introduction of “the systems “. How it became more European. How the differences between Latin America and Europe became less sharp. I thought I was going to read about Cruyff and Beckenbauer. I thought I was going to read about how dull 90 and 94 were. I thought I was going to read about the quixotistic pursuits of Tele Santana in 82 and 86 (the best national team I ever saw playing, Brazil with Falcao, Sócrates, Juniors and Zico). But no, all I got was a tirade about how Pelé sold out. What a waste of time.

Richard Pearse
RP
Richard Pearse
1 year ago
Reply to  Jorge Espinha

I agree with you on this – a great man has died, he was a miracle on the pitch, almost like ballet.

When Maradona died last year, there were nothing but accolades about how the kid from the bário became one of the greatest of all time.

But with Pelé – THE greatest of all time, we get this drivel about how he “sold” viagra etc (anyone but me remember Michael Jordan’s underwear advertisements?).

A great man, a hero of Brazil (like Babe Ruth in the US), passes on and we are told how he helped to ruin football – May he rest in peace!

(full disclosure/ I’m a Yank from Chicago who has lived in Brazil for 5 years and become an obsessed “soccer” fan).

Christopher Barclay
CB
Christopher Barclay
1 year ago
Reply to  Richard Pearse

Currently there is a disconnect between the Brazilian team and half of the Brazilian public because of many of the footballers’ open support for the racist Bolsonaro. Pele himself gave Bolsonaro a signed shirt.

Richard Pearse
RP
Richard Pearse
1 year ago

Your point? Pelé is racist-adjacent because he signed a shirt for the President of Brasil?! The time Brasileiro is to be condemned for political preferences (don’t tell me, you mean that Bolsonaro is “fascist”, racist, running dog capitalist?).

Half the country voted for Bolso and have for Lula – who was put in jail for 12 years (after appeals to the appellate and Supreme Court) but then, after the statute of limitations had run, came up with a new ruling to let him off on a technicality without disputing any facts of his taking “something of value” from the corrupt government he oversaw. In the 90’s, he inaugurated the Sao Paolo Forum with Fidel Castro for Latin American “socialism” , and now he promises to bust the recovering budget with “social Justice” spending!?, and you worry about signing a shirt.

Anyway, as I noted above, a great man has passed away, and his body is not cold in the grave before this article whines about changes to Association Football and Pelés part in it – unlike the praise that Maradona received after he passed last year. Talk about racist!

Allison Barrows
AB
Allison Barrows
1 year ago

Right. Just call the guy you don’t support “racist”. That’s what political discourse is nowadays. D*mn lazy, but at least you don’t have to make a cogent argument.

Stephanie Surface
Stephanie Surface
1 year ago

Pele didn’t give a sh..t about politics.

Jorge Espinha
JE
Jorge Espinha
1 year ago

Neymar supported Bolsonaro. Whatever you may think of him, and I think very little of the guy, he left the institutions untouched. We can’t say the same of some of Lula’s pals, namely Kirchner and Chavez. It pisses me off the double standard. Bolsonaro gets more international oprobion that the Venezuelan regime , one third of Venezuelans left the country! Or Cuba, in 2022 2% of Cubans fled the country. Castro was another great friend of Mr Lula that presided over the Mensalão , one of the biggest corruption scandals of the history of the Americas! Maybe there was good reasons to prefer Bolsonaro to Lula.

Samir Iker
SI
Samir Iker
1 year ago

Is there a disconnect between the other half of the Brazilian public and any footballers who don’t support Bolsonsro?

Maybe the issue isn’t his “racism” but the fact that leftist leaders and voters stopped growing since the mental age of six.

Richard Pearse
Richard Pearse
1 year ago

Your point? Pelé is racist-adjacent because he signed a shirt for the President of Brasil?! The time Brasileiro is to be condemned for political preferences (don’t tell me, you mean that Bolsonaro is “fascist”, racist, running dog capitalist?).

Half the country voted for Bolso and have for Lula – who was put in jail for 12 years (after appeals to the appellate and Supreme Court) but then, after the statute of limitations had run, came up with a new ruling to let him off on a technicality without disputing any facts of his taking “something of value” from the corrupt government he oversaw. In the 90’s, he inaugurated the Sao Paolo Forum with Fidel Castro for Latin American “socialism” , and now he promises to bust the recovering budget with “social Justice” spending!?, and you worry about signing a shirt.

Anyway, as I noted above, a great man has passed away, and his body is not cold in the grave before this article whines about changes to Association Football and Pelés part in it – unlike the praise that Maradona received after he passed last year. Talk about racist!

Allison Barrows
AB
Allison Barrows
1 year ago

Right. Just call the guy you don’t support “racist”. That’s what political discourse is nowadays. D*mn lazy, but at least you don’t have to make a cogent argument.

Stephanie Surface
Stephanie Surface
1 year ago

Pele didn’t give a sh..t about politics.

Jorge Espinha
JE
Jorge Espinha
1 year ago

Neymar supported Bolsonaro. Whatever you may think of him, and I think very little of the guy, he left the institutions untouched. We can’t say the same of some of Lula’s pals, namely Kirchner and Chavez. It pisses me off the double standard. Bolsonaro gets more international oprobion that the Venezuelan regime , one third of Venezuelans left the country! Or Cuba, in 2022 2% of Cubans fled the country. Castro was another great friend of Mr Lula that presided over the Mensalão , one of the biggest corruption scandals of the history of the Americas! Maybe there was good reasons to prefer Bolsonaro to Lula.

Samir Iker
SI
Samir Iker
1 year ago

Is there a disconnect between the other half of the Brazilian public and any footballers who don’t support Bolsonsro?

Maybe the issue isn’t his “racism” but the fact that leftist leaders and voters stopped growing since the mental age of six.

Christopher Barclay
Christopher Barclay
1 year ago
Reply to  Richard Pearse

Currently there is a disconnect between the Brazilian team and half of the Brazilian public because of many of the footballers’ open support for the racist Bolsonaro. Pele himself gave Bolsonaro a signed shirt.

Tony Price
Tony Price
1 year ago
Reply to  Jorge Espinha

What a strange comment. Pele’s commercial activities are mentioned almost in passing as part of the change to football’s corporate world – hardly a ‘tirade’. You might have thought that it was going to be an article about how the game as played has changed, but it isn’t, so why whinge!

Jorge Espinha
Jorge Espinha
1 year ago
Reply to  Tony Price

The title is “football died after Pelé”. I do think I was right in assuming it was about football or at the very least I expected a bit more about the scoundrels that took FIFA’s helm.

Jorge Espinha
JE
Jorge Espinha
1 year ago
Reply to  Tony Price

The title is “football died after Pelé”. I do think I was right in assuming it was about football or at the very least I expected a bit more about the scoundrels that took FIFA’s helm.

Stephanie Surface
SS
Stephanie Surface
1 year ago
Reply to  Jorge Espinha

Absolutely agree..

Michael Lynch
ML
Michael Lynch
1 year ago
Reply to  Jorge Espinha

That 82 team was sensational. But I think you can mount an argument that the 74 Dutch side, with Cruyff, Neeskens, Van Hanegam, Rensenbrink, Kiezer et al were equally good – perhaps in a more structured ”alternative” fashion. That they didn’t win in either 74 or 78 (even without Cruyff) remains a mystery to me

Richard Pearse
Richard Pearse
1 year ago
Reply to  Jorge Espinha

I agree with you on this – a great man has died, he was a miracle on the pitch, almost like ballet.

When Maradona died last year, there were nothing but accolades about how the kid from the bário became one of the greatest of all time.

But with Pelé – THE greatest of all time, we get this drivel about how he “sold” viagra etc (anyone but me remember Michael Jordan’s underwear advertisements?).

A great man, a hero of Brazil (like Babe Ruth in the US), passes on and we are told how he helped to ruin football – May he rest in peace!

(full disclosure/ I’m a Yank from Chicago who has lived in Brazil for 5 years and become an obsessed “soccer” fan).

Tony Price
Tony Price
1 year ago
Reply to  Jorge Espinha

What a strange comment. Pele’s commercial activities are mentioned almost in passing as part of the change to football’s corporate world – hardly a ‘tirade’. You might have thought that it was going to be an article about how the game as played has changed, but it isn’t, so why whinge!

Stephanie Surface
SS
Stephanie Surface
1 year ago
Reply to  Jorge Espinha

Absolutely agree..

Michael Lynch
Michael Lynch
1 year ago
Reply to  Jorge Espinha

That 82 team was sensational. But I think you can mount an argument that the 74 Dutch side, with Cruyff, Neeskens, Van Hanegam, Rensenbrink, Kiezer et al were equally good – perhaps in a more structured ”alternative” fashion. That they didn’t win in either 74 or 78 (even without Cruyff) remains a mystery to me

Jorge Espinha
Jorge Espinha
1 year ago

Yet another article that doesn’t deliver what promises in the title. I thought I was going to read about the fundamental way football changed with introduction of “the systems “. How it became more European. How the differences between Latin America and Europe became less sharp. I thought I was going to read about Cruyff and Beckenbauer. I thought I was going to read about how dull 90 and 94 were. I thought I was going to read about the quixotistic pursuits of Tele Santana in 82 and 86 (the best national team I ever saw playing, Brazil with Falcao, Sócrates, Juniors and Zico). But no, all I got was a tirade about how Pelé sold out. What a waste of time.

John Ramsden
John Ramsden
1 year ago

I notice no women have so far commented on this article, which goes some way to support my view that if truth be known few women give a toss about football and probably most team sports (any more than I do) ! They have more sense.
That makes it even more ludicrous and incongruous that the BBC take pains to have several female commentators for football and darts. Credit where it is due though, the women commentators put on a tremendous show of being interested in the proceedings!

John Ramsden
JR
John Ramsden
1 year ago

I notice no women have so far commented on this article, which goes some way to support my view that if truth be known few women give a toss about football and probably most team sports (any more than I do) ! They have more sense.
That makes it even more ludicrous and incongruous that the BBC take pains to have several female commentators for football and darts. Credit where it is due though, the women commentators put on a tremendous show of being interested in the proceedings!

Matt Hindman
Matt Hindman
1 year ago

As an American, I have never really been into the sport. That being said, this was beautifully written.

Frank McCusker
Frank McCusker
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt Hindman

Americans tend to feel they’re not getting their money’s worth unless there are lots and lots of scores. The thing about soccer is that you can have an absorbing 0-0 finish, and an exasperating 4-3 finish marred by errors. 
The rest of the world has an instinctive feel for football, since we’ve all tried it – in the backyard, in the schoolyard, in the park etc. 
And, having tried the skills yourself, it gives you an appreciation for 2 things – how simple a game soccer is (“jumpers for goalposts”, almost no kit needed), and how difficult it is to play well.
Without that practical immersion, you may never develop a love for the game. 
Many years ago, I was at a corporate event, held in the Dallas Cowboy’s stadium. Tremendous stadium, retractable roof, air-conditioned etc. Obviously, those Y-shaped American football posts. 2 rock bands, lashings of free beer, burgers, and, best of all, a couple of thousand American footballs lying about, so that, instead of being shrived by PowerPoint, we all charged around and had football kicking competitions. 
I was middle-aged, and only average at free kicks. But we were gods compared to the American guys. All the non-American blokes (Paddies, Brits, S Americans etc) could kick the ball over the bar from a reasonable distance. Not a single American there could kick snow off a rope. It was genuinely startling. The first American kicker in our informal group, a big fit young lad placed the ball, stepped a few paces back, ran up, swung his foot, and completely missed the ball, before almost falling on his arse! Many more sliced the ball completely sideways. 
Initially, I thought they must surely be taking the p, or be drunk, for I had never seen such a woeful exhibition of kicking in all my life. It was pinch-yourself-in-disbelief bad. But on talking to them, I realised they were not drunk at all, and they weren’t messing about. They were trying their best. They just literally had never kicked a ball in their lives before. 
People from the rest of the world play soccer, rugby, Aussie rules, Gaelic football etc, and all of these sports required you to be able to kick a ball. American football just has one guy dedicated to kicking, and the rest of them, professional “footballers” need never kick a ball in their lives.
Of course, by now bursting with smugness at being so easily able to school our US friends in the art of place kicking, later in the evening, the tables were turned on us when the competition turned to throwing the ball. We could fling the ball to an average level, not too long and not too accurately, but lots of the US guys could launch it like a rocket, high, dead straight, with pin-point accuracy, and for twice or three times the distance we could. Throwing a ball is part of US culture, and their facility with that skill was obvious – they were as excellent at throwing as they had been dire at kicking.
As things stand though, lack of widespread cultural familiarity with soccer means that, despite recent relatively good showings by the US women and men, soccer still looks set to be a minority sport in the US.

Last edited 1 year ago by Frank McCusker
Rhys Jaggar
RJ
Rhys Jaggar
1 year ago
Reply to  Frank McCusker

That’s why it’s so sick that the USA is trying to enforce cultural mores of the USA onto the global game. They seriously want quarters, not halves; they never stop calling squads ‘rosters’; they never stop calling dressing rooms ‘locker rooms’; they think they should own the top European clubs and try and force a closed-shop Superleague on the world.
They really do need to learn that they are 5% of the world’s population and a pretty barbarous 5% at that.

Christopher Barclay
Christopher Barclay
1 year ago
Reply to  Frank McCusker

A Cuban immigrant to the USA explained to me that Americans can’t understand admiring a passage of play if it didn’t result in a goal. They expect a reward for each piece of good play. That’s why basketball is so popular.

Rhys Jaggar
Rhys Jaggar
1 year ago
Reply to  Frank McCusker

That’s why it’s so sick that the USA is trying to enforce cultural mores of the USA onto the global game. They seriously want quarters, not halves; they never stop calling squads ‘rosters’; they never stop calling dressing rooms ‘locker rooms’; they think they should own the top European clubs and try and force a closed-shop Superleague on the world.
They really do need to learn that they are 5% of the world’s population and a pretty barbarous 5% at that.

Christopher Barclay
Christopher Barclay
1 year ago
Reply to  Frank McCusker

A Cuban immigrant to the USA explained to me that Americans can’t understand admiring a passage of play if it didn’t result in a goal. They expect a reward for each piece of good play. That’s why basketball is so popular.

Frank McCusker
Frank McCusker
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt Hindman

Americans tend to feel they’re not getting their money’s worth unless there are lots and lots of scores. The thing about soccer is that you can have an absorbing 0-0 finish, and an exasperating 4-3 finish marred by errors. 
The rest of the world has an instinctive feel for football, since we’ve all tried it – in the backyard, in the schoolyard, in the park etc. 
And, having tried the skills yourself, it gives you an appreciation for 2 things – how simple a game soccer is (“jumpers for goalposts”, almost no kit needed), and how difficult it is to play well.
Without that practical immersion, you may never develop a love for the game. 
Many years ago, I was at a corporate event, held in the Dallas Cowboy’s stadium. Tremendous stadium, retractable roof, air-conditioned etc. Obviously, those Y-shaped American football posts. 2 rock bands, lashings of free beer, burgers, and, best of all, a couple of thousand American footballs lying about, so that, instead of being shrived by PowerPoint, we all charged around and had football kicking competitions. 
I was middle-aged, and only average at free kicks. But we were gods compared to the American guys. All the non-American blokes (Paddies, Brits, S Americans etc) could kick the ball over the bar from a reasonable distance. Not a single American there could kick snow off a rope. It was genuinely startling. The first American kicker in our informal group, a big fit young lad placed the ball, stepped a few paces back, ran up, swung his foot, and completely missed the ball, before almost falling on his arse! Many more sliced the ball completely sideways. 
Initially, I thought they must surely be taking the p, or be drunk, for I had never seen such a woeful exhibition of kicking in all my life. It was pinch-yourself-in-disbelief bad. But on talking to them, I realised they were not drunk at all, and they weren’t messing about. They were trying their best. They just literally had never kicked a ball in their lives before. 
People from the rest of the world play soccer, rugby, Aussie rules, Gaelic football etc, and all of these sports required you to be able to kick a ball. American football just has one guy dedicated to kicking, and the rest of them, professional “footballers” need never kick a ball in their lives.
Of course, by now bursting with smugness at being so easily able to school our US friends in the art of place kicking, later in the evening, the tables were turned on us when the competition turned to throwing the ball. We could fling the ball to an average level, not too long and not too accurately, but lots of the US guys could launch it like a rocket, high, dead straight, with pin-point accuracy, and for twice or three times the distance we could. Throwing a ball is part of US culture, and their facility with that skill was obvious – they were as excellent at throwing as they had been dire at kicking.
As things stand though, lack of widespread cultural familiarity with soccer means that, despite recent relatively good showings by the US women and men, soccer still looks set to be a minority sport in the US.

Last edited 1 year ago by Frank McCusker
Matt Hindman
MH
Matt Hindman
1 year ago

As an American, I have never really been into the sport. That being said, this was beautifully written.

Philip Burrell
Philip Burrell
1 year ago

An interesting article but a very stupid title. Football didn’t die after Pele, it just changed. Despite the corruption at FIFA and the state takeover of top European teams, the game as a spectacle at the top level is as good if not better than it was back in 1970.
However the World Cup is no longer the top level as regards quality, that accolade passed to the Champions League a few years ago. The group stages of that competition can be a drag, but once it gets to the knock-out matches, then that is the time to watch the best football in the world today.

Philip Burrell
PB
Philip Burrell
1 year ago

An interesting article but a very stupid title. Football didn’t die after Pele, it just changed. Despite the corruption at FIFA and the state takeover of top European teams, the game as a spectacle at the top level is as good if not better than it was back in 1970.
However the World Cup is no longer the top level as regards quality, that accolade passed to the Champions League a few years ago. The group stages of that competition can be a drag, but once it gets to the knock-out matches, then that is the time to watch the best football in the world today.

El Uro
El Uro
1 year ago

In short, the grass was greener and the girls were sweeter

Jorge Espinha
JE
Jorge Espinha
1 year ago
Reply to  El Uro

Written by a guy that was too young to have witnessed any of that.

El Uro
El Uro
1 year ago
Reply to  Jorge Espinha

Bro, I’m 69 and I’ve seen Pele and Maradona play, but that doesn’t stop me from enjoying Messi’s playing 🙂
By the way, Messi is the best dribbler I have ever seen.

Last edited 1 year ago by El Uro
El Uro
El Uro
1 year ago
Reply to  Jorge Espinha

Bro, I’m 69 and I’ve seen Pele and Maradona play, but that doesn’t stop me from enjoying Messi’s playing 🙂
By the way, Messi is the best dribbler I have ever seen.

Last edited 1 year ago by El Uro
Jorge Espinha
Jorge Espinha
1 year ago
Reply to  El Uro

Written by a guy that was too young to have witnessed any of that.

El Uro
El Uro
1 year ago

In short, the grass was greener and the girls were sweeter

Stephanie Surface
Stephanie Surface
1 year ago

Saldanha, the Brazilian coach for the 1970 World Cup, was crazy and was very likely not sacked because of his left wing politics. These are pure speculations by the author… The truth is, that he didn’t want Pele to play. Pele never cared about politics, but only about the “beautiful game”. Saldanha lied and claimed, Pele was nearly blind and therefore unable to play. This was a huge shock for Pele, as he was desperate to challenge himself at this time in his career, it was all personal for him this time (according to his interview) and not about his beloved Brasil.

Last edited 1 year ago by Stephanie Surface
Stephanie Surface
Stephanie Surface
1 year ago

Saldanha, the Brazilian coach for the 1970 World Cup, was crazy and was very likely not sacked because of his left wing politics. These are pure speculations by the author… The truth is, that he didn’t want Pele to play. Pele never cared about politics, but only about the “beautiful game”. Saldanha lied and claimed, Pele was nearly blind and therefore unable to play. This was a huge shock for Pele, as he was desperate to challenge himself at this time in his career, it was all personal for him this time (according to his interview) and not about his beloved Brasil.

Last edited 1 year ago by Stephanie Surface
Mark M Breza
Mark M Breza
1 year ago

Hey was not George Best the best ?

Graeme McNeil
CS
Graeme McNeil
1 year ago
Reply to  Mark M Breza

No. Next question.

Jorge Espinha
Jorge Espinha
1 year ago
Reply to  Mark M Breza

You do have to show up every once in a while a actually play a couple of games. Maybe if he had played for England instead of NI…but he was a drunk, even at that time it was unsustainable.

Graeme McNeil
CS
Graeme McNeil
1 year ago
Reply to  Mark M Breza

No. Next question.

Jorge Espinha
JE
Jorge Espinha
1 year ago
Reply to  Mark M Breza

You do have to show up every once in a while a actually play a couple of games. Maybe if he had played for England instead of NI…but he was a drunk, even at that time it was unsustainable.

Mark M Breza
Mark M Breza
1 year ago

Hey was not George Best the best ?