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Will Boris survive a revolt on the Right? Nigel Farage is back — and the Tories should be worried

The real Don Corleone (Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)


January 11, 2022   5 mins

“Just when I thought I was out, they pull me back in,” says Don Michael Corleone in the final instalment of The Godfather. One man who could relate to that scene is Nigel Farage: despite his best efforts, he simply can’t escape British politics.

Disillusioned with Boris Johnson’s premiership and what he sees as the Government’s failure to make the most out of Brexit, Farage has made clear his intention to get more involved with Reform, the party which replaced the Brexit Party. Should Boris be worried?

It is easy to laugh at Farage, but one key lesson of the last decade is to never underestimate him. Were it not for him and his political crusade, the UK would almost certainly still be in the European Union and Labour would still have its Red Wall.

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Currently averaging 5% in the polls, Reform, under the stewardship of former Brexit Party MEP Richard Tice, is making no secret of its political strategy: it plans to exploit the rapidly growing rift between Boris Johnson and his conservative voters who are today just as likely to come from the Labour heartlands as the Tory shires.

Therein lies a crucial point. Many of the voters on whom Boris Johnson depends are more blue-collar, non-graduate and culturally conservative than those who supported David Cameron just a few years ago. They are more purple than blue, more Faragist than Cameroon.

And they too have learned an important lesson: they can use revolts on the Right to bend the Tories to their will. Many of these voters have gone on a long political journey, from choosing New Labour in the 2000s, David Cameron in 2010, Ukip at the European elections, the Brexit Party in 2019 and finally Boris Johnson. Will they defect again? It’s now in their DNA.

So what is Reform’s pitch to them? Whereas Farage used to campaign relentlessly against the European Union, mass immigration and what he saw as a homogeneous political class in Westminster, Reform has kept much of the latter while reforming the former.

With Brexit now delivered, Farage has changed gear, talking more about Net Zero than needing to leave the EU. His plan is to remind voters across the Red Wall that one quarter of their electricity bills is now spent on green subsidies, that Channel crossings are out of control, that immigration has not yet been brought back under control and that under Boris Johnson the country is now ruled by “a metropolitan Tory chumocracy totally detached from the rest of the country”.

Scroll through Reform’s policies and you’ll find an offer tailored for the very people who are now abandoning Johnson in the polls. A call to return to low taxes. To push back against ‘woke nonsense’. To reform the BBC. And to restore freedom of speech.

One person who would approve is Lord Frost, who this week used his first intervention since resigning from government to urge Johnson to become a ‘true Tory’ or risk imminent defeat. He pointed to many of the same issues that are being targeted by Reform: sharp tax rises, an obsession with Net Zero, the failure to make the most out of Brexit, the policing of other people’s opinions by those who Frost calls “woke warriors” — people who appear determined to revise if not repudiate British history, identity and culture.

To what extent is there room for such a revolt? Almost a decade ago, in Revolt on the Right, Robert Ford and I warned that the Conservative Party was vulnerable to a rebellion on its Right flank among specific groups of voters who both main parties had lost sight of: working-class, non-graduate, culturally conservative, older Britons. Shortly afterwards, Farage and Ukip won the 2014 European Parliament elections before a majority of voters then opted for Brexit. The revolt went mainstream.

Yet far from resolving this underlying tension, in many ways Brexit and Boris Johnson now appear to be breathing new life into it. There was always an open question as to whether Johnson would be able to hold support from the cultural conservatives who flocked to Farage and Brexit. And now, at the halfway point of his premiership, we are getting the answer.

Johnson is increasingly adrift from his core supporters on not just one but many issues, so much so that it is not hard to see how Reform, which is already attracting around 11% of the Leave vote, could soon morph into a far more formidable force in British politics. While they might not have any upcoming European elections, which Farage used to demonstrate his electoral credibility, they do have the fact that Boris Johnson is currently haemorrhaging Leave voters.

In the polls, the picture facing the Conservative Party today is even worse than it was before Christmas, when it first became clear that Leavers were starting to abandon the party in droves. While Labour have cemented their lead, the Conservatives have now not held a lead outside the margin of error since the first week of November. And at the heart of this are the very voters who Reform and Farage now have within their sights.

The share of Leave voters who plan to vote Conservative at the next election is continuing to slide, from 72% last June to 62% in October, 60% in November and 58% this month. Today, remarkably, fewer than half of Leavers think that Johnson, who actually delivered Brexit, would make the best Prime Minister.

Nor are these the only signs which point to potential inroads for Reform. Amid an escalating cost of living crisis, higher inflation and looming tax rises, a tide of disillusionment is now sweeping through an already fragmenting Conservative electorate.

One survey last week put the Conservatives sixteen points behind Labour across more than fifty seats which Johnson won in 2019. Another suggests almost 80%  of Red Wallers say Johnson ‘does not understand their pain’. And another finds that while only 26% of British voters have heard of ‘levelling-up’, almost three-quarters of people across the north do not know what it means or have never heard of it at all.

It will take more than a delayed levelling-up white paper to solve this. Johnson has simply failed to sell his core policies to his core voters. Pollsters might point to the fact that large numbers of voters say we should tackle climate change as evidence for the suggestion they will put up with costly climate change policies. But they miss a key point. For many conservatives this is simply not a salient issue. They just do not see it as a pressing priority in the way fighting crime or curbing immigration are.

Meanwhile, when it comes to Brexit, only half of Johnson’s core voters think it is going well. When it comes to immigrants crossing the English Channel, not even one in ten think the government is doing a good job. And when it comes to levelling-up, only 8% think it will lead to more money being spent on their local area.

It is a similar story for other areas which are attracting the wrath of prominent Eurosceptics such as Jacob Rees-Mogg, including tax. For the first time since Boris Johnson took power, today the share of Conservatives who think the Government is taxing too much and spending too much on public services has eclipsed the share who think it has got the balance right.And when it comes to cancel culture, while most conservatives think the Government should prioritise the protection of free speech, nearly two-thirds also feel they are now living in a country where they have to stop themselves from expressing their real views because of their fears about what will happen if they do.

These things matter. Many people in Britain do feel, strongly, that ancient and hard-won freedoms are under threat from an alliance of Big Tech, radical progressives and cancel culture. The Left might dismiss all this as ‘culture war politics’, but it could easily become as potent for the radical Right today as Brexit was to an earlier generation.

We simply now live in a country where voters have become far more used to switching their political loyalties from one election to the next, where the Conservative Party’s leadership is no longer aligned with its new electorate, where the vote for Brexit has shown voters the kind of change they can bring about and where culture remains just as important as economics. It might be tempting to argue that the revolt on the Right is over — but only a fool would believe it.


Matthew Goodwin is Professor of Politics at the University of Kent. His new book, Values, Voice and Virtue: The New British Politics, is out on March 30.

GoodwinMJ

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Galeti Tavas
Galeti Tavas
2 years ago

Boris is the person I like least in all politics. Corbyn and Biden, AOC and Abbot – they are really, really, wrong and very bad for the country, but still, I cannot summon up the contempt I have for Boris when thinking of them.

Boris is the guy who could really, really, get UK on track. He has the power, the backing by voters, and we all know – UK has the need for good leadership, this is a vital time, winning or losing are merely forks in the road now.

Instead he is a sly Buffoon up to something, but no one knows what it is. One cannot know what he believes, as he may not have any beliefs, and just be the Glib shell he appears to be.

And that is what I cannot forgive. He has the education, contacts, power, the great nation in need, everything needed to really make Britain great again – but instead he just shoves Britain another foot down the slippery slope to more chaos and hard times. He is a vacillating coward, Pu** y whipped and selling out to the elites by selling out his country. F-Boris.

If only Britain had a Florida Governor DeSantis, a SD Governor Kristi Noem, someone who was strong, serious, honorable, and out to make the best of what they have – instead you have Farage a bit Buffoonish too, bit shifty eyed – he is better than Boris, but not cut for the top job – but no one in the line of succession is…

Matt M
MM
Matt M
2 years ago
Reply to  Galeti Tavas

What do you make of DeSantis, Galeti? Is he the real deal? He certainly looks like it at first glance from over here.

Last edited 2 years ago by Matt M
Andrzej Wasniewski
Andrzej Wasniewski
2 years ago
Reply to  Matt M

I am living now in DeSantis Florida and he is the real deal. He is the subject of relentless lying of the corporate media, and they cannot bite him. Florida has no restrictions, wide availability of vaccines, but no mandates of any kind, and the COVID numbers numbers in the middle of the pack. The most important thing: people see him governing, solving problems, pushing back against the COVID suicide pact led by Biden and the media.
The subject of the incredible damage that Faucism and teachers unions inflicted on children is becoming a mainstream discussion that CNN and other dr Goebbels disciples cannot stop.
And DeSantis did not let it happen to the children in Florida.

Claire D
Claire D
2 years ago
Reply to  Galeti Tavas

The thing is Galeti, Boris and Farage were not sprung on the British people out of thin air, they are not gods. We made them, voted for them (not me personally) in enough numbers to put them in place, just as we did with Margaret Thatcher and Tony Blair (not me either). I sympathise with your disappointment, but then I tell myself off for being so unrealistic as to believe they can be anything more than they are, and not heroes.
I am willing to give Boris Johnson the benefit of the doubt considering how challenging the last two years have been, he did nearly die of Covid after all, but we’ll see.

Add on @ 3.30pm:
Another party scandal, worse than before. That’s it for me. Unscrupulous fools.

Last edited 2 years ago by Claire D
Andrew Fisher
AF
Andrew Fisher
2 years ago
Reply to  Galeti Tavas

I thought you thought everything was a global conspiracy, in which case what is left to explain?

Will R
Will R
2 years ago
Reply to  Andrew Fisher

Ha! Brilliant!

Zorro Tomorrow
Zorro Tomorrow
2 years ago
Reply to  Andrew Fisher

You must admit with “he is a sly Buffoon up to something, but no one knows what it is.” he has a point.

Tony Conrad
TC
Tony Conrad
2 years ago
Reply to  Zorro Tomorrow

I think he won over the country because of standing for Brexit but now I am not sure if that was just a political ploy. Lets say I am in need convincing when it comes to Northern Ireland who are still trapped by the EU.

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
2 years ago
Reply to  Tony Conrad

NI is not ‘trapped’ in any way: they have the penny and the bun! They trade tariff free with both the EU and GB! On the pig’s back! At least when they don their business hats even the most ardent, die hard Unionist budinessman is up for that! Ask a few of them if you don’t believe me!

Martin Bollis
Martin Bollis
2 years ago
Reply to  Galeti Tavas

Some of the shenanigans required to force an election and get Brexit done took real cojones, so he should get some credit for that.

The levelling up agenda tuned in to a very real political shift. He gets credit for identifying that. That the pandemic has delayed any real delivery is a reason rather than an excuse, but a clear exposition of what it means, with supporting policies and budget, is now urgent.

The overwhelming criticism levelled at him over Covid has largely been based on being too slow to lock down or not imposing harsh enough measures. The fact he finished up in intensive care with it may have affected his resistance to the immense pressure from all sides to be more draconian than was necessary.

Once the huge economic damage has been done, it has to be paid for. Harking back to Thatcherite economics, whilst ignoring a debt level equivalent to fighting a major war, is fantasy politics.

His frivolous persona is relentlessly pushed at us by an MSM that we all acknowledge as a disgrace. The above achievements are enough to question their version, whilst acknowledging that part of his appeal is that he’s not grey.The next two years will tell us more than the last two whether he really has a vision and the skills to deliver.

Despite the above defence I’m not hopeful. The calibre of his cabinet is the most telling criticism. Losing Cummings was a major strategic error.

Andrew Martin
AM
Andrew Martin
2 years ago
Reply to  Martin Bollis

Yes losing Cummings by means of his female Rasputin advisor who also turned him from a Climate sceptic to a Climate Zealot. It is clear to me where his downfall originated.

Jane Watson
JW
Jane Watson
2 years ago
Reply to  Andrew Martin

I think Carrie’s veggie/vegan diet can’t be helping either. He looks on the way to T2 diabetes; it’s not working for brain or body.

Charles Lewis
Charles Lewis
2 years ago
Reply to  Andrew Martin

To have a Conservative PM taking orders from a ‘woke’ wife is enough for me to want him out.Let’s have Truss as PM (question mark…)

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
2 years ago
Reply to  Charles Lewis

Yes it is fair game to get rid of him because of his woke wife. A wife is important in a leader. It’s part of the deal.

Hugh Marcus
Hugh Marcus
2 years ago
Reply to  Charles Lewis

From buffoon to air head then. (Ex Lib Dem & remainer) More faces than Big Ben, saying whatever it takes as long as project Liz is advanced. Do you people never learn?

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
2 years ago
Reply to  Andrew Martin

I agree. He has changed his politics since being elected. The only problem is who else is there that can take the helm but maybe the Brexit parties can unite and work together and make it work. As far as I can see they are cancelling each other out.

Last edited 2 years ago by Tony Conrad
Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
2 years ago
Reply to  Andrew Martin

Uh oh: cancellation for you Martin I fear: bit o’ the ol’ misogyny creepin’ in. Naughty step!

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
2 years ago
Reply to  Martin Bollis

I might agree if it weren’t for the greedy profligacy and cronyism, and the shameless flauting of his own govt rules: but maybe they don’t count? What’s a few billion between friends and who doesn’t tweek the rules a bit from time to time eh? But wait, what about the disastrous economic forecast? Hang on: that’s a bridge too far methinks.

Charles Lawton
Charles Lawton
2 years ago
Reply to  Galeti Tavas

Totally agree, but many of us knew this long ago, his first term as London Mayor was littered with self inflicted damage just like the Owen Patterson affair. Now he is starting to lose the support of the right wing press it’s only a matter of time before he is history. I am trying to contain my personal feelings on this, we buried my father who died of Covid the same day as the Party in the garden at Downing Street (infected by an untested NHS patient who was sent to his care home in late March 2020).

Kathleen Stern
Kathleen Stern
2 years ago
Reply to  Charles Lawton

But those decisions were down to the hallowed NHS weren’t they. Radical surgery needed to make them improve. Silly vaccine threats won’t help though. Plenty of overpaid managers to take up the slack?

Kiat Huang
KH
Kiat Huang
2 years ago
Reply to  Galeti Tavas

Boris was on the right track until he allowed his girlfriend, now wife to influence him. He is a changed man – and for British political life – not for the better.
But, @Galeti let’s not overegg Boris’s power outside his office: he was a journalist, an MP, a London mayor, an unabashed Tory – but he does not hold intrinsic power as a man, or as head of a family: he has benefited from the favours of those with real power (money, connections, influence).

Andrew Martin
Andrew Martin
2 years ago
Reply to  Kiat Huang

Very True but why did Conservative Central Office not deal with her. The moment I saw Joseph’s Technicolour Dreamcoat of a flat I knew who was wearing the trousers. The man is a hopeless case when it comes to Women and not someone who can be trusted with making the right decisions.I do feel sorry for the Red Wall MP’s who must be seething with rage at the carry ons at number 10.and 11.Downing Street.

Last edited 2 years ago by Andrew Martin
Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
2 years ago
Reply to  Andrew Martin

Women have always been his weakness. Alas we are stuck with it unless a new face comes along.

Bryan Dale
Bryan Dale
2 years ago
Reply to  Galeti Tavas

Britain, as a great country and founder of all English speaking peoples, should look to great leaders, not provincial followers. We need a man like Donald Trump to lead Britain back to greatness.

Cathy Carron
Cathy Carron
2 years ago
Reply to  Bryan Dale

Many of us in the USA would like Trump back as well, especially given the senile b**b running things at the moment….

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
2 years ago
Reply to  Cathy Carron

Oh yes. Most sensible people in Britain realise that Biden is a total loss.

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
2 years ago
Reply to  Cathy Carron

Tough choice for the USA: indanity or senility? Don’t you have anyone else? You can maybe initiate a psychological test and an IQ test: surely someone will come through for you guys?

Cathy Carron
CC
Cathy Carron
2 years ago
Reply to  Liam O'Mahony

Trump in not ‘insanity’ – he’s clever as a fox and did many good things (deregulation, immigration, trade, the highest increase for the bottom two tiers of workers in decades, highest employment rate for blacks, etc) all while enduring Democrat hijinx (Russia hoax, defamation, etc). Trump 2024, yes indeed.

Peter Smith
Peter Smith
2 years ago
Reply to  Bryan Dale

Not Donald Trump! Does anybody remember Mosley?

Tony Conrad
TC
Tony Conrad
2 years ago
Reply to  Peter Smith

No thanks.

Tony Conrad
TC
Tony Conrad
2 years ago
Reply to  Bryan Dale

I would definitely vote for Trump but I cannot imagine him in Britain.

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
2 years ago
Reply to  Tony Conrad

I cannot imagine him for Bongo Bongo land let alone the USA.. how about North Korea? He has a like-minded ally there. Russia might also work: vice president to Vlad: yep, that’ll work fine!

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
2 years ago
Reply to  Bryan Dale

Ha Ha! I presume you’re joking? No? You really think Britain founded all the English speaking peoples of the world? Can you define what you mean by ‘founded’ – the old OED is not of use in this case: clearly!

David Bell
David Bell
2 years ago
Reply to  Galeti Tavas

Spot on about Boris but you are way too dismissive of Farage. He has principles that appeal to most centrists and charisma.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
2 years ago
Reply to  David Bell

Yes he has a lot of insight and appears to know instinctively what is rubbish and what’s not.

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
2 years ago
Reply to  Tony Conrad

Mmm might need a little more than that! How about a certificate of sanity? And an IQ test so he doesnt offer to buy Iceland again?

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
2 years ago
Reply to  Galeti Tavas

I think he behaved atrociously in the Glasgow Cop meeting. Almost like a dictator regarding global warming. Most sensible people do not believe that rubbish. And please understand Boris a man is a man and a woman is a woman and leave our children out of it.

Bret Larson
Bret Larson
2 years ago
Reply to  Galeti Tavas

Politics makes for strange bedfellows. The current winds are not aligned with Boris’s druthers so he appears to be listless. I wouldn’t call it moribund, but if you’re listless long enough in politics that can be the result.
Hopefully he can get the country back on the path of economic expansion. All other social needs will depend on it.

Peter LR
Peter LR
2 years ago

I am seriously looking at Reform and this is a marginal seat. I don’t see the need for a Hell for Leather approach to reach zero emissions when we only produce 1% of the world’s total CO2.

Kiat Huang
Kiat Huang
2 years ago
Reply to  Peter LR

The singular focus on nation’s total CO2 emissions is part of the picture, the other telling statistics are CO2/unit of population or CO2/unit of GDP.

Justin Clark
Justin Clark
2 years ago
Reply to  Peter LR

Needs all decent Conservatives to make that move over, because if a half measure then we know who gets in… Poor Farage got 4M votes but not a single seat in the house to represent… FPTP vs PR argument etc.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
2 years ago
Reply to  Justin Clark

But at the very least we need a good opposition to the tories and not the leftwing crowd who try and fulfil that role.

David Bell
WA
David Bell
2 years ago
Reply to  Peter LR

I think the risk of a giant asteroid hitting the earth and wiping out humanity is far greater than the faddish “climate emergency” that they keep trying ram down our throats.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
2 years ago
Reply to  David Bell

I agree. I believe it is one big deception that is forced on people for some reason. Maybe ulterior motives?

Mike Smith
Mike Smith
2 years ago
Reply to  Tony Conrad

Making money for people like Al Gore, Gates etc who have invested in wind turbine and solar panel companies.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
2 years ago
Reply to  Peter LR

I don’t even agree with the science personally. Coal and gas etc. are gifts from God which people need.

Frederick B
FD
Frederick B
2 years ago

Johnson has been fortunate, to date, that the dire consequences of his new open borders immigration policy (deceitfully called a “points based” policy) has been concealed by the effects of Covid with a large, but temporary, drop in immigration during 2020. It won’t last and immigration certainly picked up again in 2021.
Goodwin is right. The room for a renewed revolt on the right is growing.

Simon Denis
Simon Denis
2 years ago
Reply to  Frederick B

Indeed, the revolt has already happened among all authentic Conservatives who keep abreast of the news; it has yet to filter through to those too busy or too sensible to worry – but it will – especially given the cost of living crisis about to engulf them. In Johnson, meanwhile, we have less a leader than a cheerleader: vapid, modish, spineless, unprincipled and hollow. This is now widely accepted. Already he has been booed at football matches; his bluff bloke act is broken, his “jokes” are despised and his whole approach stands revealed as idle and arrogant. Even the cabinet, deliberately composed of mediocrities to prevent challenges to his inevitably weak, incompetent leadership, now routinely over-rules him. There is no return from this degree of exposure. There are few creatures more worthily reviled than indolent, self-seeking chancers like Johnson. He is a balloon – and the only reason he won’t go pop is because he is already half wilted.

Last edited 2 years ago by Simon Denis
Kiat Huang
Kiat Huang
2 years ago
Reply to  Simon Denis

Maybe you are absolutely right @Simon. At the outset Boris led from the front, now he progressively leads (if at all – how can we be sure?) from the back. He really has messed up his own performance and reputation, sadly for me, as I had very optimistic hopes he would captain the country into far better waters. Firmly and fairly, not weakly and uncontrollably.

Charles Lewis
CL
Charles Lewis
2 years ago
Reply to  Simon Denis

 vapid, modish, spineless, unprincipled and hollow’. Why do you mince your words?

George Wells
George Wells
2 years ago
Reply to  Frederick B

The points based criteria are too low.

Frederick B
Frederick B
2 years ago
Reply to  George Wells

It would also help if, as was the case until last year, the jobs for which visas are granted had first to be advertised in Britain, and if there was a cap on numbers.

Jeremy Bray
Jeremy Bray
2 years ago

The danger for Boris is if he believes he won the Red seats because he was more left/ liberal than other Tory PMs. Whereas he won them because more traditional Labour voters realise Labour is too woke and is not in fact the party with the interests of the ordinary white working class voter in mind. The facts of life are conservative not the woke lie.

Last edited 2 years ago by Jeremy Bray
Chelcie Morris
CK
Chelcie Morris
2 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Bray

I genuinely think Boris thinks this. It makes sense if he does. Boris needs to meet the average voter and they need to set him straight otherwise this will only continue.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
2 years ago
Reply to  Chelcie Morris

In other words he is falling for the narrative put out by the woke media and is not one of us anymore.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
2 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Bray

I don’t know anyone who believes in woke. It appears to be coming from the universities and imposed on the schools. I feel really sorry for the children these days with the rubbish that is forced on them.

Trevor Law
Trevor Law
2 years ago

Politicians: “Do you want fluffy bunnies?”
Voters: “Yes please!”
Government publishes fluffy bunny plans: “£20,000 upfront plus £2,000 per annum per household”
Voters: “What?!!”
Politicians: “We have a mandate for delivering fluffy bunnies”
Activists: “Fluffy bunny deniers!!”
Voters:  **** ***!!! 

Andrew Fisher
Andrew Fisher
2 years ago
Reply to  Trevor Law

Very good!

Katharine Eyre
Katharine Eyre
2 years ago

“Today, remarkably, fewer than half of Leavers think that Johnson, who actually delivered Brexit, would make the best Prime Minister”.
Johnson was the midwife of Brexit. Once the child is out into the world, the midwife’s job is done. It’s the parents’ job to bring the child up. Post-Brexit Britain needs that kind of parental stewardship.
“These things matter. Many people in Britain do feel, strongly, that ancient and hard-won freedoms are under threat from an alliance of Big Tech, radical progressives and cancel culture. The Left might dismiss all this as ‘culture war politics’, but it could easily become as potent for the radical Right today as Brexit was to an earlier generation”.
Have I understood that right – the protection of ancient hard-won freedoms is now a preserve of the radical right? Seriously? That should be about as mainstream as you get!

Kiat Huang
Kiat Huang
2 years ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

I like the midwife analogy @Katherine !
Warming to the theme, the delivery of Brexit started with the conception of it by Farage with him firmly pushing at one end, then dithering May, then Boris pulling at the other. In the end it felt less of a natural birth, more a C-section.
Nigel stirred this nation, which Boris then capitalised on, but who was the real genius in all this? Who really made the difference? Perhaps it is not one or the other but both.
I felt during the weeks following the historic Brexit vote, that the Conservative Party really missed a trick by disgracefully shunning Nigel Farage, who for years made a heroic and brilliant stand against the EU bureaucracy designed to wear whole countries – let alone individuals – down.
The Tories with Nigel Farage, would have been far stronger, had they been able to work out a way to use his talents to their advantage and keep him happy (I suspect he wants to make a comfortable living, no aspirations to be as rich as Blair or Cameron and would like to be properly recognized by the establishment for his stunning achievements)

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
2 years ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

You could have a point.

Graham Stull
Graham Stull
2 years ago

Nice article, but I’m curious as to why there is no mention of covid in all this. Does the author not consider it to be a significant issue, alongside immigration, Brexit and woke culture?
It certainly seems to me that Reform benefits enormously from the Tories’ brush with covid zealotry – a religion fully embraced on the pages of the Guardian but viewed with skepticism elsewhere.
Maybe I’m overstating the importance though, because it’s such an important issue for me? Any Britons care to comment?

Andrew Fisher
Andrew Fisher
2 years ago
Reply to  Graham Stull

Up until recently the voters said they wanted severe restrictions (whether they did as they said is another matter). But that seems to be changing now, even Nicola Sturgeon is on the whole mainly issuing nannnyish advice rather than using legal methods.

D M
D M
2 years ago
Reply to  Graham Stull

Covid will go away. The other issues are fundamental for the long term.

Graham Stull
Graham Stull
2 years ago
Reply to  D M

I’ve heard this said before. About 18 months ago, when I was told covid would be going away shortly. Then, 12 months ago, when I was told we had a vaccine that would wipe the virus out.
As of today, I can’t go to my office. I need a facemask to go on a train or enter a shop. I can’t eat in an indoor restaurant and they are threatening to take my job away from me.
So I do hope you’re right soon.

D M
RM
D M
2 years ago
Reply to  Graham Stull

I think you are right that covid may not go away soon but I am much more worried about losing our culture, freedom an way of life as once they are lost they are gone forever. And I do not understand why normal common sense is portrayed as hard right or worse

Last edited 2 years ago by D M
Graham Stull
Graham Stull
2 years ago
Reply to  D M

Good questions and genuine concerns.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
2 years ago
Reply to  D M

The people who are against ordinary common sense have just lost the plot and get angry if you point it out.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
2 years ago
Reply to  Graham Stull

I think people need to wise up on what their MP votes for. I am shocked at what my MP has backed but nothing is said about it in our local press etc.

Tony Conrad
TC
Tony Conrad
2 years ago
Reply to  D M

Unless they start getting legalistic over colds and the flu which seems to be happening now.

Steve Hoffman
Steve Hoffman
2 years ago
Reply to  Graham Stull

I, too, was surprised at no mention of covid and am not convinced that it will go away any time soon. I don’t know what Farage’s position on it is, but there is a growing realisation that (1) lockdowns haven’t really worked and represent a huge violation of personal freedoms and (2) the vaccines have been a disappointment. If Boris now took a more De Santis line by dropping all the lockdown fear-mongering bad science, ditched the face masks and all the other incursions of personal liberty, he might recover his red wall popularity, but he seems to be too much a prisoner of Big Pharma and the elites that have ruined the economy, our children’s education etc.

Last edited 2 years ago by Steve Hoffman
Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
2 years ago
Reply to  Steve Hoffman

My wife and I have just got Covid but are fine now after 3/4 days. I don’t understand the big deal about it as there are many around us who have been through the same and are well.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
2 years ago
Reply to  Graham Stull

The truth of Covid is yet to surface so it is difficult to comment.

Lesley van Reenen
LV
Lesley van Reenen
2 years ago

Eric Weinstein describes the heroes, the geniuses and the rebels as being the people who will change the world.
I supported Boris from afar, because regardless of his flaws (and they are many), he was the one person who could get Brexit over the line…. and he did. He is bold, he is a maverick and he is not stupid. Mavericks are the ones who will get the impossible done. And never underestimate the person who plays the clown – they are seldom stupid as the clown is merely a disguise. The clown loves the outrageous humour, but he is competitive – it is all just theatre. I can recognize them as I have played the clown often throughout my life.
Boris’s undoing is twofold in my opinion – firstly he married someone who undermines his performance. He is classical liberal and she is woke. She started influencing him and alienated his closest allies. He was not elected to roll out a woke agenda – rather he is there to challenge it. He will come to regret that life choice.
Secondly and aligned to the Carrie issue, is Covid. His initial sense was to address the disease by following a GBD route – then he was advised to be seen to be doing something ‘for the people’, because most people haven’t the wit or intelligence to understand targeted protection of the people while protecting the economy. He didn’t row back on that because he was beaten down by two things – his near brush with death and his involvement with Carrie who used his weakness to gain more power.
As things stand, I don’t hold out much hope for him

Last edited 2 years ago by Lesley van Reenen
Kiat Huang
Kiat Huang
2 years ago

Nicely put @Lesley. Like you I feel that Carrie is at the root of his decline. But she exploited a private weakness in Boris that he had already, as we all have weaknesses of one kind of another, so he is human like the rest of us. But Boris is Prime Minister – he put his personal life above his office and for that he can not forgive him, not for marrying per se, but in marrying someone who is destructive to his office, to his party’s health. He’s not stupid, but Boris should have seen the warning signs of a non-elected relative wanting to exert influence and power at the heart of No 10.
Boris just happened to decide on someone who is the antitheses of him, or rather his beliefs in what the country should be like. She is not a traditionalist, she is an inclusivist in she sense she thinks everyone should be included, all the time, whatever the cost. I maybe wrong about them, but Boris & Carrie are a terrible political combination that will cost the Tories the next election and probably Boris’ seat which I’m not sure his charm will rescue.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
2 years ago
Reply to  Kiat Huang

I think you could be right. When you lead the country your marriage is not personal if it affects your leadership.

Cathy Carron
Cathy Carron
2 years ago

Boris’s undoing is twofold in my opinion – firstly he married someone who undermines his performance. He is classical liberal and she is woke.”
What you’re saying is that Boris is not ‘his own man’, in effect not a true leader.

Andrew Martin
Andrew Martin
2 years ago
Reply to  Cathy Carron

Ha ha… have you seen the state of that Flat at No11?

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
2 years ago

I suppose we have to put up with him a little longer.

Steven Farrall
Steven Farrall
2 years ago

These voters (like me) who are despairing of Doris & Co are not of ‘The Right’. This is a false dichotomy. They (we) are not Left either.

Tom Lewis
Tom Lewis
2 years ago

Is ‘right’ ‘left’ really still a good way to describe the political incontinence of contemporary Britain ? What might once have been termed the left, in particular those that veer towards the extreme end of that particular bent seem to escape all scrutiny about connection to dodgy-ness and even outright barbarity while increasingly anyone to other side of Mao is seen as only one short step away from goose stepping across their front lawn, right hand out stretched. There are, I’m sure, large swathes of the population who feel alienated by what’s on offer, rather than included, even going so far as to vote for people they might otherwise loath, just to have their ‘whisper’ heard when the politicians ‘slip up’ and give the punters a real say.
The terms seem to have become increasingly anachronistic and meaningless with regards to how people might actually think, not that anyone seems to bother asking ( except Brexit perhaps and, I assume, nobody, with their hands on the levers of power would want to do that again……the horror, actual democracy in action……after all what harm did democracy ever do to the Athenians)

SULPICIA LEPIDINA
SL
SULPICIA LEPIDINA
2 years ago
Reply to  Tom Lewis

“(after all what harm did democracy ever do to the Athenians)”.

Besides provoking the disastrous Peloponnesus War it produced Athen’s answer to Boris, one Alcibiades.
Perhaps Boris should return to his Thucydides for inspiration before it is too late?

Charles Lewis
Charles Lewis
2 years ago

I can’t imagine Boris turning to Socrates and saying:’ I am amazed that you can spend the whole night next to me without desiring me.’

Hugh Eveleigh
Hugh Eveleigh
2 years ago

I have never laughed ‘at’ Nigel Farage but I have appreciated his refreshing directness and, I suspect, his honesty. I voted Conservative last time but unless there is a radical about turn it will be Reform next. My only gripe with the latter is their manifesto to rid us of the Lords. That in my opinion is disastrous. Reform it, limit it, change it yes but get rid of an advisory second chamber: absolutely not,

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
2 years ago
Reply to  Hugh Eveleigh

The Lords isn’t what it was. Yes reform it but understand the corruption that resides in many of it’s members and they are there for life.

Kiat Huang
KH
Kiat Huang
2 years ago

An article that goes beyond having a well-positioned finger on the pulse of English voting public to understanding its mind as well. There is no doubt that Boris has used up the stores of voter goodwill his personality over the years has built up. He is progressively confused & weak on key cross-party issues: what the masses really care about. Setting a solid path for the country out of these Covid years, sorting out uncontrolled immigration, reining in spending (everyone knows we will be paying for this via taxation and degradation of services – money does not grow on trees), cultivating an environment that raises the standard of living, stop the abuses of our property ownership and taxation systems, build more council houses and flats, punishing cronyism and constantly eradicating it like the weeds they are within English political life..
Reform has a chance with Farage. They could pick off seats and build a decent minority, but if (and it is a very unlikely if) they get their act together, run near flawless campaigns, are a bit lucky and get the masses behind them, they could overtake either the Tories or Labour or both. It has been a century since there were serious shifts in political parties, but that doesn’t mean another one can’t happen. The Great War changed much, but then so could Brexit+Covid.

Last edited 2 years ago by Kiat Huang
Kiat Huang
Kiat Huang
2 years ago

Nigel – I’m sure someone will show you this article and I’m hopeful that you will read the comments – take heart that there is a battle to be won in England. The masses respect what you did for the country with Brexit and would love to see you at the heart of the British political establishment, rather than frittering your energies away at the fringes. Can you take Reform and (learning from all the lessons of your previous forays into political parties) make it into a genuine competitor to Labour and the Conservatives? Putting those key values the masses care about at the core of Reform and sticking to them, through thick and thin (at least for a decade 🙂 ) will drive real confidence to get Britain back on track to where it should be heading.

Andrew Martin
Andrew Martin
2 years ago
Reply to  Kiat Huang

Splitting the vote is not ideal but it might work when Corbyn starts his own Party.

Kiat Huang
Kiat Huang
2 years ago
Reply to  Andrew Martin

Would it not be more than merely splitting the vote if Remorm attracts the bulk of the ex-Labour voters who got the Tories over the lIne and with a healthy majority to boot, but now feel let down by them?

hugh bennett
hugh bennett
2 years ago
Reply to  Kiat Huang

Yes, take heart Nigel. The Tories will never free Wales from the iron collars and ankle chains that old Labour inflict on modern Wales. But there are many seats here in the Principality that could be won by a Reform Party headed by national figure like NF. It could shake Welsh Labour to the core.

Last edited 2 years ago by hugh bennett
Jane Watson
Jane Watson
2 years ago

“We simply now live in a country where voters have become far more used to switching their political loyalties from one election to the next”…

The voters are the reliable bunch here. It’s the political parties who can’t seem to grasp the priorities of Joe Public. Journos fantasise about Red Wall ignoramuses turning blue because they hate immigrants.

Don’t forget Maggie Thatcher took the working class with her. People knew then, as they know now, when someone has the gumption and the guts to deliver for the country as a whole.

We thought Boris had a clue, maybe not, but someone needs to get a grip.

Andrew Martin
AM
Andrew Martin
2 years ago
Reply to  Jane Watson

Well there is certainly no change in Labour voters or should I say the Citizen Smiths out there who froth at the mouth regarding the rich and their tax the Bar Stewards for every penny they got.I wonder where all the money will go if they gain power?

Jane Watson
Jane Watson
2 years ago
Reply to  Andrew Martin

But there are plenty of working class traditionally Labour voters who are very aware of the abuse of the benefits system (by native Brits and illegal immigrants). Those who work and pay taxes see others live cushioned lives on benefits. They will know single women (and those with secret partners) who have numerous children and live for free in 3 and 4 bedroom houses. They might believe the rich can afford to pay more tax, but working people do not like to see a system that benefits freeloaders.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
2 years ago
Reply to  Jane Watson

What about those with four wives in one house all getting benefits. Why work?

Last edited 2 years ago by Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
2 years ago
Reply to  Andrew Martin

To Stonewall?

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
2 years ago

Excellent, but Reform MUST have the courage, like Zemmour, not to back down to meeja accusations of the dreaded-catch all ” racism” atomic weapon, and push the free speech anti hate crime fervour that is there for the taking: only today, whilst barristers tgreaten to strike, and police raid the wrong addresses due to IT misfunction, the CPS wants to spend our money in defending poor ‘ ickle footbally wally boys from having ” rent boy” chanted at them?!!! Ceaucescu is here…

Jonathan Story
Jonathan Story
2 years ago

Isee reference to Boris as a “sly buffoon” etc. I can’t for the life of me see what is sly about turning up to the CBI and messing one’s speech; not standing by Owen Paterson, on the simple grounds that we don’t do Stalinist trials in the UK; not taking on woke in the civil service; not maximising the UK’s energy resources; not realising that 160constituencies are maritime, so fishing really is many times more important politically than it has become economically; not making it clear that permanent EU/French denigration of this country does not go unnoticed etc. The simple point is that if you wish to govern this country, you have to earn, then retain the consent of the governed.

Last edited 2 years ago by Jonathan Story
Sheridan G
Sheridan G
2 years ago

We voted for the policies of one Johnson, but sadly got the policies of the other. Boris seems to have changed his opinion on so many matters, and this change coincides with him hooking up with Carrie. How are Boris’s advisors supposed to compete with his desire for domestic – err – harmony?

Andrew Martin
Andrew Martin
2 years ago
Reply to  Sheridan G

Well they clearly didn’t did they? And that is exactly the reason he has come unstuck. One thing you can clearly say about Boris is that he is not Misogynistic.

Ian Stewart
Ian Stewart
2 years ago

I’m ok with Boris – he’s not competent and bumbles along swayed by those around him and reacting to events, and that’s what I like. The country is being buffeted by extreme events and in my view we need a malleable leader with little ideology. Look at Trump or Biden, Macron, Putin, Merkel and you see stronger, more competent leaders – and they confidently follow their beliefs to extremes. Johnson shifts like the grass blowing in the wind – no ideological extremes here.
On Covid, we suffered a lot at the start, and everyone blamed Johnson – and now we’re about 75th in the world for most excess deaths. For a country on a major international cross roads that’s pretty good.
On Brexit, he forced through a rubbish deal – we all knew it was rubbish and would have to be revised. I thought it would take us at least 15 years to get the economic win from Brexit, and still supported it, so I think we’re doing fine on that despite the MSM berating it along with politicians of all stripes, including Tories.
I’ve come to the conclusion that muddling and bumbling due to extreme events, whilst very inefficient, seems to be working. But it won’t work once we settle into normality, when sensitive hands on an ideological tiller will be needed.

William Shaw
William Shaw
2 years ago

Easy to laugh at Nigel? No, I don’t think so.
It should be Sir Nigel.

Matthew Powell
Matthew Powell
2 years ago

If recent revelations have a silver lining, it’s that if Boris survives, he almost certainly will no longer be free to pursue his own agenda anymore. Power will shift to the Parliamentary party and as support is likely to have collapsed with more centrist voters, the Conservatives will have to pivot to the right to recapture those leaning towards the Reform party if they wish win a majority at the next election.

AC Harper
AC Harper
2 years ago

It’s very fashionable to excoriate Boris, and there are many reasons to do so. But his unique selling point is that he sells the idea that he is not as other politicians. Now it may be that the Corona virus has attracted all his attention as PM but I suspect that he could shortly relaunch Brexit Britain once the pandemic is over – if he chooses to.

Zorro Tomorrow
Zorro Tomorrow
2 years ago

I’d love Nigel to do something. Tice is a caretaker, a school caretaker who knows everyone in and everything about the school but will never be the headmaster. Trouble is Farage is a marmite figure and people associate him with Trump. Whatever, Farage will do what ReformUK haven’t, tell everyone what he plans to do, where and with whom. All we’ve seen is Ben Habib and a bit of Widdiecombe. Coveney ran off with Fox and JRM’s sister went home. I’ve been watching and listening for a while wondering if the red wall new 2019 intake or indeed any backbenchers are wavering. Lee Anderson. Would his followers follow him as far as Farage? I doubt Arness’s seat will fall but what about Dromey’s? Would one RuK seat on the opposite benches tempt a floor crossing?

Jesse Porter
Jesse Porter
2 years ago

Boris is very like Trump, an aristocrat who pretends to be like common folks, a liberal who pretends to be conservative and very divisive, either loved or hated. I suspect that he will face a similar fate, snatching defeat out of success. Britishers are as politically confused as are Americans, being led into slavery joining the European Union then seeing the utter folly of being bled dry by their poorer neighbors. Over-the-poverty Americans similarly sold themselves into slavery to under-the-poverty line Americans, starting in 1964 and to our much poorer southern neighbors in overdrive since 2020.
Undoubtedly, both will overcorrect, Britain to trying to protect their position from the rest of Europe, shown in the Brexit movement, and ‘rich’ America turning protective against the poor, shown in their embrace of Trumpism in 2016. The competing stances will swing wildly into and then out of favor, probably until a major crisis forces a resolution. America is already facing the likelihood of another civil war. Britain is more likely to face a dissolution comparable to the end of colonialism. Both are in danger(?) of facing the fate of the USSR, which I would welcome–smaller states usually resist tyrants.

Sean Penley
Sean Penley
2 years ago

We simply now live in a country where voters have become far more used to switching their political loyalties from one election to the next”
Although speaking from a different country, I think having voters who are willing to switch loyalties rather than vote tribally is a good thing. When politicians feel they don’t have to earn your vote, they won’t. It was a big problem in my area growing up. My grandparents’ generation voted tribally for a certain party. For most of their lives it had aligned with their interests quite well, but as I was growing up it was changing. It became a fan of lots and lots of restrictions on just about everything in the world. This was an area that isn’t fond of restrictions of any kind. These laws were extremely unpopular, but the same politicians kept getting elected because my grandparents’ generation just couldn’t seem to make the connection between who they were electing and the kinds of laws they were getting. They wanted to blame Congress or DC, but these were county and city-level laws.
For the party in question, this eventually led to a complete collapse in the area. Because when people finally got fed up and started paying attention, the exodus wasn’t gradual. The party spent far too much time focusing on what it could force on people because it could assume their loyalty, and that was true up until it wasn’t, and the party hasn’t been able to carry the area in nearly two decades now, with little prospect for being able to do so in the future. And a lot of their stupid restrictions were eventually lifted by their replacements.
Thing is, if voters had not voted tribally in the first place, they would never have faced these restrictions. And they could have had a much more functional two-party system, because each would have to worry about possibly losing and thus having to care what people thought instead of what they wanted to force on people.

Tony Conrad
TC
Tony Conrad
2 years ago

Reform have a brilliant system of telling how one’s MP voted on different things. I am shocked on how my MP is voting. The tories are still too woke and have lost the plot on the great global warming deception. If there were enough candidates on the ground they would get my vote. Trees and plants actually need carbon to survive so I do not understand this zero thing. It looks set to cost us our economy to the benefit of China and India.

Last edited 2 years ago by Tony Conrad
Richard Lewis
Richard Lewis
2 years ago

Back in the days of the Tory / Liberal coalition, Boris came across to me as a one nation Tory who wants to be liked and who was popular with the electorate. He never presented as a detail driven decision-maker, nor as a right winger. His instinct for reading the people and yearning for approval led to his plunge on Brexit and it paid off, but surely people expected him to tack to the centre ground as soon as he could.
Having such a person as PM is not necessarily a bad thing, but he needs a lot of help to govern the country, which he does not have. The cabinet is derided as lightweight, but it is as good as is available to the Tories given that so many of their senior members disgraced themselves trying to avoid Brexit. The civil service was obstructive early in the government tenure and now seems merely incompetent; they also lost many seniors in the Remainer rear-guard bonfire.
Within weeks of delivering on Brexit the Johnson government was hit by the Covid meteorite. To my mind, Boris and his 2nd 11 team have zig-zagged with popular opinion in the crisis response, but seem to have found the correct path with vaccines.
However, the huge cost (and wastage) in the Covid response has compromised the rest of Boris’s centrist agenda, featuring levelling up and net zero. The budget blow-out is being compounded by consequences of 25 years of incoherent (one must admit primarily Tory) energy policy coming home to roost. Covid and the energy market melt down (up), would test any government, this one urgently needs help. Any talent from the ex-Remainers willing to serve?

Chelcie Morris
Chelcie Morris
2 years ago

Another problem with the Tories is that they are lead around by the balls by the Left and they don’t even realise it. Everyone else can see it. They think that culture is beneath them which is why they are so easily startled by, and reactionary to, temper tantrums by the Left (Sarah Everard anyone?), which is why the Left dominate industry, institutions and tech and the Tories are to blame for this neglect.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
2 years ago

Doomed by his wife then.

Bret Larson
Bret Larson
2 years ago

Fear leading to authoritarianism has seen alot of advocates during the pandemic. Once pandemic politics is behind us I think he’ll do fine.

SULPICIA LEPIDINA
SULPICIA LEPIDINA
2 years ago

..

Last edited 2 years ago by SULPICIA LEPIDINA
David Harris
David Harris
2 years ago

“It might be tempting to argue that the revolt on the Right is over — but only a fool would believe it.”
Well, maybe we’ve got one running the country.

Last edited 2 years ago by David Harris
Justin Clark
Justin Clark
2 years ago

I wonder how many people are now checking back on their calendars to see what they were doing that day, 20th May 2020…

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
2 years ago

Good piece… It will just take courage for some big Tory rightists to defect to Reform… if Sunak, Rees- Mogg, Kwarteng and Truss did, reform would be in government within months…

Hugh Marcus
Hugh Marcus
2 years ago

The curse of identity politics. As someone from Northern Ireland where we’ve lived with this stuff for years, trust me, healing grabbing populists never deliver. They can’t & that’s simply because its easy to be populist ‘get brexit done’, ‘take back control’ etc etc are all just kept rhetoric. Once they sit down at that nicely polished ministerial desk & an official sets a deep pile of papers on it, all of them requiring decisions & subtlety they melt like snow on a warm day.
Sorry if you’ve ever given any of these twats your precious vote, you’re reaping what you sowed. Sadly we all have to pay the price.

Milos Bingles
Milos Bingles
2 years ago

The lies and scapegoating of Populism rises in Britain once again. We should be very frightened by this man. A man who as a youth was obsessed by Hitler. Despite all the tweed, ale and fags he is a dangerous populist.

Last edited 2 years ago by Milos Bingles
D Glover
D Glover
2 years ago
Reply to  Milos Bingles

I watch him sometimes on GB News. He seems sane and not obsessed to me.
By ‘populist’ you mean that he expresses what a lot of Brits really think. He opposes intervention in middle eastern wars. He opposes illegal immigration.
I’d vote for him, if I ever got the chance. And there lies the rub; under our electoral system many won’t get the chance, and those who do might let in Starmer.
In 1968 opinion polls showed that Powell was far more popular than Heath. If we had had presidential elections Powell could have won, easily. But we have party elections, and Heath had a party.

Milos Bingles
Milos Bingles
2 years ago
Reply to  D Glover

The fact you watch GB News says it all.

Graham Stull
Graham Stull
2 years ago
Reply to  Milos Bingles

You know, that’s the very sort of comment that does a disservice to debates. Why attack the man for his choice of viewing? Why not engage on the issues?
Maybe you don’t like GB News, but then you should be able to articulate what it is he is getting from them that so poisons his political perspective. Non?

Martin Bollis
Martin Bollis
2 years ago
Reply to  Milos Bingles

A statement of tribal affiliation devoid of reason.

Milos Bingles
Milos Bingles
2 years ago
Reply to  Martin Bollis

Any channel that gives air time to Dan Wootton can not and should not be taken seriously.

Martin Bollis
Martin Bollis
2 years ago
Reply to  Milos Bingles

And again, a statement of tribal affiliation devoid of reason.

Milos Bingles
MB
Milos Bingles
2 years ago
Reply to  Martin Bollis

Everything that comes out of Dan Wootton’s mouth is garbage. Same as the vile far-right con artist Farage.

Last edited 2 years ago by Milos Bingles
Martin Bollis
MB
Martin Bollis
2 years ago
Reply to  Milos Bingles

And again.

Perhaps try “ I don’t agree with Dan Wooton’s stance on xy or z because.”

Something like this: I believe Owen Jones is not only misguided but actively dangerous to the ongoing health of British society, because he consistently espouses a modern form of cultural Marxism and has a significant platform to do so. It is my strong belief that the philosophy espoused by him (and people like him with a similar platform through the MSM) will lead to catastrophic decline if they are successful in completely replacing competitive excellence with competitive victimhood.

Last edited 2 years ago by Martin Bollis
Milos Bingles
Milos Bingles
2 years ago
Reply to  Martin Bollis

Owen Jones appeals to a left-wing niche. Farage uses techniques he has lifted directly from Mein Kampf. The way he operates is identical to how Hitler lays out how to win over the masses in his book. He even copied a Nazi propaganda poster for crying out loud. He spent his youth running around Dulwich singing NAZI songs (a fact on record according to his teachers) with a keen interest in Mr. Adolf. He is a dangerous dangerous man.
Dan Wootton on the other hand is just a wazzock.

Last edited 2 years ago by Milos Bingles
Martin Bollis
MB
Martin Bollis
2 years ago
Reply to  Milos Bingles

At last something to engage with.

I’d appreciate your sources for the Farage is a Nazi stories. I’m not a fan of his and, if true, my opinion would diminish.

Interestingly, the primary Nazi propaganda effort was relentlessly pushing the idea of an identifiable “other” thus providing a simplistic solution to a complex problem.

Both sides now seem to be doing that with increasing fervour. The Democrats response to 6/1, the pandemic, and invented white supremacists, are all out of that playbook.

If Owen Jones only appeals to a niche left wing audience, the same could be said of Farage at the other end. Since there are many more Jones, and the MSM clearly bends to their viewpoint, GB news and Farage are clearly a necessary counterweight.

I’m still no wiser as to who Dan Wootton is and whether I would agree with his beliefs.

Lesley van Reenen
Lesley van Reenen
2 years ago
Reply to  Martin Bollis

I am fairly sure I read a Dan Wootton article on Djokovic recently that I agreed with. I am enthusiastically joining the Milos Bingles school of debate.

Andrew Martin
AM
Andrew Martin
2 years ago
Reply to  Martin Bollis

Dan Wootton writes for the Mail Online (Daily Mail)

Karl Francis
Karl Francis
2 years ago
Reply to  Milos Bingles

I love Nana Akua. I think her show is very refreshing, much like her presentation style. If she ever visits the West county I’m going to buy her an ice-cream. Wonderful lady.

Jane Watson
Jane Watson
2 years ago
Reply to  Milos Bingles

And the fact you say that reveals your wilful ignorance

Jane Watson
Jane Watson
2 years ago
Reply to  D Glover

The ‘populist’ insult has always baffled me. I presume it implies that if you are popular with the rabble, you must be a scoundrel? No, it implies that the accuser thinks some of us are rabble.

Martin Bollis
MB
Martin Bollis
2 years ago
Reply to  Milos Bingles

Does the moderation software have a delete function? I see our little exchange on GB news has completely disappeared.

Last edited 2 years ago by Martin Bollis
Martin Bollis
Martin Bollis
2 years ago
Reply to  Martin Bollis

And now it has reappeared, odd.

Last edited 2 years ago by Martin Bollis
SULPICIA LEPIDINA
SULPICIA LEPIDINA
2 years ago
Reply to  Martin Bollis

The joys of Censorship, always a speciality of UNHERD.

Andrew Martin
AM
Andrew Martin
2 years ago

Try MSN, even normal polite conversations are reviewed or timed out.